In all fairness, I didn't claim that welfare does increase homelessness, 
though I suspect that it does, but merely pointed out that the statement seemed to 
presume--or that in any case people supporting welfare often presume--that it 
decreases homelessness.

As for emprical research, I second Tom's call.  I do seem to recall that the 
issue of welfare dependence briefly loomed large during the 1980s, and that 
one statist-liberal think-tank (I believe it was Brookings, and perhaps Bill 
Wickens recalls) published a study that concluded that welfare did not cause 
welfare dependence.  I also recall The Wall Street Journal editorial page and 
others ripping to shreds that study.  I don't recall if the study addressed 
homelessness per se.

David


In a message dated 6/20/03 11:07:14 AM, [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:

>
>
> > [EMAIL PROTECTED] writes:
>
> >> The main "good" it provides is a negative one, that of keeping
>
> >> homelessness and starvation to a low enough level to prevent
>
> >> political instability.
>
>
>
>[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
>
> > This of course presumes that the welfare state reduces homelessness
>
> > and starvation rather than encouraging it.
>
>
>
>In politics the appearance is usually more important than the reality.
>
>
>
>-- 
>
>Anton Sherwood, http://www.ogre.nu/
>
>
>
>---
>
>
>
>While I, too, fully agree (statements and inuendos) ... I'd like to challenge
>the Armchair list for objective data showing the welfare state reducing
>homelessness, or increasing it, or not.
>
>
>
>I don't think there are any good studies with good conclusions.
>
>
>
>Tom Grey

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