S. Lerner wrote:
> 
> >Date: Fri, 29 May 1998 13:37:18 -0300 (ADT)
> >From: Michael Gurstein <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> >Subject: FW: LA Times column, 5/25/98 (fwd)
> >To: Canadian futures <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>,
> >        Electronic Democracy in Nova Scotia <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
[snip]
> >From: Gary Chapman
> >To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
> >Subject: LA Times column, 5/25/98
> >Date: Tuesday, May 26, 1998 5:55AM
> >
> >Friends,
> >
> >Below is my latest column for The Los Angeles Times, from Monday, May 25,
> >1998. As always, please feel free to pass this on, but please retain the
> >copyright notice.
[snip]
> >What will be the Next Big Thing? This is the gnawing question that keeps
> >young entrepreneurs and venture capitalists awake at night, wondering what
> >the next killer app is going to be and how they can discover it before
> >anyone else.

There is at least one "Next Big Thing" 
that is probably going to partly happen,
but only superficially.  The superficial 
part is something called XML
(eXtended Markup Language), which will 
replace HTML as the markup language
of web pages, and the most "important" 
use of which will probably
be to facilitate the Internet being 
used by computer programs (as opposed
to human beings) to communicate 
between each other (e.g., your HMO will
ask your doctor for your medical 
records, and the doctor's computer will
send them back...).  The part that 
probably won't happen -- at least
in a way that will realize its 
full cultural potential -- is what XML is
based on: SGML (Standard Generalized 
Markup Language), which "looks like"
XML, but has some subtle differences 
(see, e.g., my

       http://www.cloud9.net/~bradmcc/sgmlnote.html

) which may contain potential to 
transform our relation to language (in
ways "analogous" to what alphabetic 
writing and uniform printed editions did).

> >
> >But the next big thing may be a popular rejection of the high-tech
> >lifestyle altogether.
[snip]

Sorry to be a spoil-sport, but, 
even granting the fact that
bacteria are becomeing resistent 
to antibiotics, I'd still rather
have antibiotics than not have 
them (I've had several bouts of bronchitis
lately that kept getting worse until I
took antibiotics, and I don't want to be
either crippled or dead unless I have no
choice!).  Also, it simply is not possible
to have a meaningful "life of 
the mind" (well, maybe that's something
people don't want any more...) when you
spend most of your waking hours *laboring*,
whether it's for a multi-national corporation
*or* for "Gaia" ("the soil of the fruitful
earth").  Godel, Bach (and, yes, Escher...)
are not possible in a society which is both
non-technological *and* non-exploitive.

\brad mccormick 

-- 
   Mankind is not the master of all the stuff that exists, but
   Everyman (woman, child) is a judge of the world.

Brad McCormick, Ed.D. / [EMAIL PROTECTED]
914.238.0788 / 27 Poillon Rd, Chappaqua, NY 10514-3403 USA
-------------------------------------------------------
<![%THINK;[SGML]]> Visit my website ==> http://www.cloud9.net/~bradmcc/

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