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This cheered me up on a foggy Monday morning!  Speech writer Richard Nixon,
eh? In any case she has Trump down pat.

comradely

Gary

On Sat, Jul 29, 2017 at 5:19 AM, Louis Proyect via Marxism <
marxism@lists.csbs.utah.edu> wrote:

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> (Peggy Noonan was a speechwriter for Richard Nixon.)
>
> WSJ Op-Ed, July 28, 2017
> Trump Is Woody Allen Without the Humor
> Half his tweets show utter weakness. They are plaintive, shrill little
> cries, usually just after dawn.
> By Peggy Noonan
>
> The president’s primary problem as a leader is not that he is impetuous,
> brash or naive. It’s not that he is inexperienced, crude, an outsider. It
> is that he is weak and sniveling. It is that he undermines himself almost
> daily by ignoring traditional norms and forms of American masculinity.
>
> He’s not strong and self-controlled, not cool and tough, not low-key and
> determined; he’s whiny, weepy and self-pitying. He throws himself, sobbing,
> on the body politic. He’s a drama queen. It was once said, sarcastically,
> of George H.W. Bush that he reminded everyone of her first husband. Trump
> must remind people of their first wife. Actually his wife, Melania, is
> tougher than he is with her stoicism and grace, her self-discipline and
> desire to show the world respect by presenting herself with dignity.
>
> Half the president’s tweets show utter weakness. They are plaintive,
> shrill little cries, usually just after dawn. “It’s very sad that
> Republicans, even some that were carried over the line on my back, do very
> little to protect their president.” The brutes. Actually they’ve been
> laboring to be loyal to him since Inauguration Day. “The Republicans never
> discuss how good their health care bill is.” True, but neither does Mr.
> Trump, who seems unsure of its content. In just the past two weeks, of the
> press, he complained: “Every story/opinion, even if should be positive, is
> bad!” Journalists produce “highly slanted & even fraudulent reporting.”
> They are “DISTORTING DEMOCRACY.” They “fabricate the facts.”
>
> It’s all whimpering accusation and finger-pointing: Nobody’s nice to me.
> Why don’t they appreciate me?
>
> His public brutalizing of Attorney General Jeff Sessions isn’t strong,
> cool and deadly; it’s limp, lame and blubbery. “Sessions has taken a VERY
> weak position on Hillary Clinton crimes,” he tweeted this week. Talk about
> projection.
>
> He told the Journal’s Michael C. Bender he is disappointed in Mr. Sessions
> and doesn’t feel any particular loyalty toward him. “He was a senator, he
> looks at 40,000 people and he probably says, ‘What do I have to lose?’ And
> he endorsed me. So it’s not like a great loyal thing about the
> endorsement.” Actually, Mr. Sessions supported him early and put his
> personal credibility on the line. In Politico, John J. Pitney Jr. of
> Claremont McKenna College writes: “Loyalty is about strength. It is about
> sticking with a person, a cause, an idea or a country even when it is
> costly, difficult or unpopular.” A strong man does that. A weak one would
> unleash his resentments and derive sadistic pleasure from their unleashing.
>
> The way American men used to like seeing themselves, the template they
> most admired, was the strong silent type celebrated in classic mid-20th
> century films—Gary Cooper, John Wayne, Henry Fonda. In time the style
> shifted, and we wound up with the nervous and chattery. More than a decade
> ago the producer and writer David Chase had his Tony Soprano mourn the
> disappearance of the old style: “What they didn’t know is once they got
> Gary Cooper in touch with his feelings they wouldn’t be able to shut him
> up!” The new style was more like that of Woody Allen. His characters
> couldn’t stop talking about their emotions, their resentments and needs.
> They were self-justifying as they acted out their cowardice and anger.
>
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