We stopped off at the Purple Martin colony at Lemon Creek Park on Staten Island 
yesterday for the first time in four years. Glad to see the birds are still 
returning. There were fledglings out and about, and, judging from parents still 
entering nests regularly, nestlings to be fed. 

There are at least a half dozen Purple Martin nests in the houses; counting is 
complicated by all the coming and going. House Sparrows and European Starlings 
have taken a good number of the nest spots. 

In Birds of the New York Area (1964), Ball cites a long study that marked a 
single pair of nesting Purple Martins at Princess Bay* (which Lemon Creek feeds 
into) in 1917. Then nothing until 1951, when 2 pairs nested. In 1961 there were 
50 pairs. 

*"Princess Bay" is found on older maps, but it is now more generally called 
"Prince's Bay."

Happy 4th! 

Matthew

Backyard and Beyond
https://matthewwills.com

  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
  
  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
  

 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
 










We stopped off at the Purple
Martin colony at Lemon Creek Park on Staten Island yesterday for the first time
in four years. Glad to see the martins are still returning. There were 
fledglings
out and about, and, judging from parents still entering nests regularly,
nestlings to be fed. There are at least a half dozen nests in the houses;
counting is difficult with all the activity. House Sparrows and European
Starlings have taken a good number of the nest holes. 

 

In Birds of the New York Area, Ball
cites a single pair of nesting martins at Princess Bay (which Lemon Creek feeds
into) a century ago. Then nothing until 1951, when 2 pairs nested. In 1961
there were 50 pairs. 

*"Princess Bay" is
found on older maps, but it is now more generally called "Prince's Bay."

 

Happy Fourth! 

Matthew

Backyard and Beyond

https://matthewwills.com

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