-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Hi Hugh, haven't heard from you in a while. Last I heard you had been sucked into the World of Warcraft? :-)



On Sun, 14 Aug 2005, Hugh Perkins wrote:

windebug works ok.  Its free, and it basically does everything that
the full Visual Studio debugger does.  Obviously it only works with
msvc-compiled objects.

Well, it's still a step up from no debugger at all.

You can get the C runtime by installing .net runtime followed by .net
sdk (in that order).  It will appear in c:\program files\microsoft
.net sdk (something like that, but definitely on C:, in program
files), independent of the directory you actually chose to install the
.net sdk into.

The C++ runtime is a little trickier to get.  Theres a CERN site that
has the import library for download.

http://root.cern.ch/root/Procedure/Procedure%20to%20install%20the%20free%20Microsoft%20Visual%20C.htm

Argh.  Why do they make this so complicated?

Other than that, the visual C++ toolkit is the full, optimizing
compiler that comes with Visual Studio .Net professional/enterprise.

You can use Cygwin/mingw to use msvc compiler from a configure file,
by using cccl.  On the other hand cygwin and mingw have unresolved
issues with forking not releasing memory on certain windows xp
machines (independent of which compiler is used), so using gnumake
could be more reliable.

I tried cccl and couldn't get it to do anything useful, so what I ended up doing was writing a makefile script that ran from automake files and produced nmake files. A nice hack and actually worked pretty well, but all in all nmake is fairly useless and most people would prefer to avoid it. What might make more sense would be to do something similar that automatically produces visual studio project files. Of course, then you get into the issue of what _version_ project files you generate, since VS 7.1 is not backwards compatible with 7.0, which is not backwards compatible with 6.0. I don't know if VS 8.0 (.NET 2005) projects are compatible with 7.1.

Theres some detailed info on the Visual C++ Toolkit at
http://manageddreams.com/osmpwiki/index.php?title=Notes_on_Microsoft_Visual_CPP_Toolkit_2003

It's almost like Microsoft is trying to discourage distributed development (typical of free software) by making it impossible for any given group of people to be able to collaborate unless they're using exactly the same version of exactly the same compiler... ***Argh!!!***

[   Peter Amstutz   ][ [EMAIL PROTECTED] ][ [EMAIL PROTECTED]  ]
[Lead Programmer][Interreality Project][Virtual Reality for the Internet]
[ VOS: Next Generation Internet Communication][ http://interreality.org ]
[ http://interreality.org/~tetron ][ pgpkey:  pgpkeys.mit.edu  18C21DF7 ]
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.1 (GNU/Linux)

iD8DBQFDAMIpaeHUyhjCHfcRAiUjAJ4jE8oVy22WVcd+TO31Z4ZZb43oBQCeISPe
r6OBWp6avJfaH/OKT9rWeV4=
=/ecl
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----


_______________________________________________
vos-d mailing list
vos-d@interreality.org
http://www.interreality.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/vos-d

Reply via email to