As a farm-boy from southern Manitoba, I can assure you that I didn't mind
daylight savings time at all.  Who the hell wants to wake up at sunrise when
sunrise is 4:30 in the morning?  5:30 is far more reasonable.  And, sunset
at 21:30 isn't unreasonable either.

Eric

-----Original Message-----
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]]On Behalf Of
Thomas TerBush
Sent: Tuesday, February 20, 2001 10:03 AM
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: Daylight savings politics


My understanding was the city-dwellers tended to be for daylight savings
time since it gave them an extra hour of sunlight in the afternoon, and
farmers tended to be against because it subtracted an hour from the morning,
although this may be in disagreement with what is happening in Mexico if
Mexico City turns out to be a more vociferous opponent than the more rural
areas.

Here in Japan we don't have daylight savings.  The story goes that the
government tried to implement it in the 1960's, but found that a lot of
people ended up working one hour longer during, so they went back to
year-round standard time.

One hypothesis would be that it is instituted to encourage more consumer
spending in the evenings.  So, maybe you could look for higher consumer
spending as one of the benefits, and some form of lower farm output as one
of the costs.

Tom

----- Original Message -----
From: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Sent: Wednesday, February 21, 2001 2:54 PM
Subject: Daylight savings politics


>
>
> > ----------
> > From: [EMAIL PROTECTED][SMTP:[EMAIL PROTECTED]]
> > Sent: Tuesday, February 20, 2001 9:54:00 PM
> > To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
> > Subject: Daylight savings politics
> > Auto forwarded by a Rule
> >
> Armchairs,
>
> What is the story behind Arizona not implementing daylight savings time?
How
> would you measure the costs and benefits of such policy?
>
> In Mexico, daylight savings were introduced some 4-5 years ago.  People
didnt
> like it. And now the new president came with a politically "good idea":
to
> reduce the savings period from 7 to 5 months to "satisfy those who were
not
> comfortable".
>
> But northern Mexican states now feel in disadvantage with their intensive
> trading partners in border US states who do apply the full 7 month period.
>
> But then again, the also new governor of Mexico city (from a different
party
> than that of the president) also got a "good idea":  Daylight savings is
> authoritarian and disrupts people's everyday lives, hence, he is
considering
> to cancel the whole savings thing in Mexico city... --a city where, to
make
> things even more nonsensical, 35% or so of nationwide economic activity is
> held and which is sorrounded by some other 10 states who do follow the
> daylight savings program.
>


Reply via email to