A profound thank you to all in this group. The responses I am receiving are 
well beyond my expectations. Everybody has been so helpful, I will battle to 
absorb all the information, but I promise I will endeavour to read every word. 

Warm regards
Mike

Sent from my iPad

> On 30 Mar 2018, at 2:30 AM, Steve Peters <spp1...@gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> On Saturday, March 17, 2018 at 10:07:32 AM UTC-7, Mickey Blue wrote:
>> Hi All, can anyone direct me to book(s) or information, hopefully translated 
>> into English, which describe social customs and life in general on Pico in 
>> 1825/35 when my Great grandfather Manuel Jacinto was born and left Pico? 
>> Were children of that era literate? Was school available to all? What work 
>> was expected of children under 10 years of age? Why would a ten year old 
>> leave home? Are there shipping records to Trinidad or Madeira (he possibly 
>> went to Madeira first).
> 
> Hi Mike,
> 
> Some books that might be helpful to you: 
> 
> Stormy Isles (aka Mal Tempo no Canal) by Vitorino Nemésio - the classic 
> Azorean epic novel set in 19th century Faial (just across the channel from 
> Pico); I honestly found it a bit tedious, but there is a lot of detail about 
> the culture of that era.
> 
> Dark Stones by Jose Dias de Melo - good short novel about growing up on Pico.
> 
> Home Is an Island by Alfred Lewis - novel about growing up on Flores in the 
> early 20th century and emigrating to California.
> 
> Azoreans to California by Robert Santos is a good history of Azorean 
> emigration, and has pertinent info about the conditions that caused people to 
> leave in the 19th century.
> 
> A lot of 19th century Azoreans - not just children - were illiterate. People 
> were very poor and education was a luxury, and this lasted well into the 20th 
> century. (The fascist dictator Salazar actively encouraged the myth of the 
> "happy, noble/ignorant peasants" who were too simple to ask annoying 
> political questions; his regime ruled until 1974.) Children were often put to 
> work at an early age, farming or as shepherds, and in the whale processing 
> plants, and when they were old enough they also went out on the shore-whaling 
> boats. Many people had large families and could not afford to feed their 
> kids, and boys who were old enough were often sent off on foreign whaling 
> ships by their parents, or they left on their own. This was often done 
> secretly at night, because there were military patrols watching for draft-age 
> stowaways leaving illegally; there was mandatory military service for boys 14 
> and older - another incentive for taking off on a whaler. 
> 
> Hope there's something helpful in there for you.
> 
> Steve
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