Richard Lockwood wrote:
> Um - what are you suggesting as an alternative?

Read the 2nd URL.

In this day and age it *is* important to teach people about electronic security.

This "story" completely fails to do so.

Excerpt from that URL:
  Legitimate data recovery firms know that recovering data from a zeroed hard
drive is impossible. They will not take the challenge. Lastly, it is noble and
just to dispel myths, falsehoods and untruths.

Whilst it is true that someone with a scanning electron microscope or the
ability to build a HDD and the associated electronics by hand could
theoretically recover some data from a wiped disk I think (as you do) it's
reasonable to assume that a crook buying HDDs on eBay isn't likely to be
operating at this level.

I actually applaud the BBC/Which? research that found these un-deleted disks and
I grant you that most people are not capable of deleting files properly and need
to be educated. However, by promoting myths the problem is made worse. A far
better approach would have been to recommend any one of the numerous 'disk
wipers' such as:
  http://www.dban.org/about

There are charitable organisations all over the world who can reuse IT equipment
and despite caveats the BBC are promoting waste and pollution - the junk will be
put in the council bins and go to landfill - not be disposed of properly.

> It's more a question of "who would WANT to spend the hours putting a
> drive back together just to get access to your £500 overdraft
> facility" - ie a question of trouble / worth.

Agreed, but as the report showed - destroying them is *hard* and dangerous.
Simply erasing them is cheap and a lot safer!

*AND* you can donate them to charity.

> Me, I reformat them,
And this is the flaw in your plan and the BBCs. "Reformatting" does not erase
data. The BBC completely failed to say:
 "You may think that reformatting works - you really need to use a special disk
eraser such as dban - otherwise you could find your second hand sale costing you
more than you could imagine."

> Where's your problem?

I hope that answers you?


David

-- 
"Don't worry, you'll be fine; I saw it work in a cartoon once..."
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