When it boils down to it, you *can* retrieve old data from a zeroed
disc.  It's a case of "is it worth it?".

In the case of criminal investigations - maybe it is.

In the case of chasing your overdraft, probably not.

The problem with the BBC's story is that they fail to make this clear.

Cheers,

R.

On Wed, Feb 25, 2009 at 8:27 PM, David Greaves <da...@dgreaves.com> wrote:
> Richard Lockwood wrote:
>> Um - what are you suggesting as an alternative?
>
> Read the 2nd URL.
>
> In this day and age it *is* important to teach people about electronic 
> security.
>
> This "story" completely fails to do so.
>
> Excerpt from that URL:
>  Legitimate data recovery firms know that recovering data from a zeroed hard
> drive is impossible. They will not take the challenge. Lastly, it is noble and
> just to dispel myths, falsehoods and untruths.
>
> Whilst it is true that someone with a scanning electron microscope or the
> ability to build a HDD and the associated electronics by hand could
> theoretically recover some data from a wiped disk I think (as you do) it's
> reasonable to assume that a crook buying HDDs on eBay isn't likely to be
> operating at this level.
>
> I actually applaud the BBC/Which? research that found these un-deleted disks 
> and
> I grant you that most people are not capable of deleting files properly and 
> need
> to be educated. However, by promoting myths the problem is made worse. A far
> better approach would have been to recommend any one of the numerous 'disk
> wipers' such as:
>  http://www.dban.org/about
>
> There are charitable organisations all over the world who can reuse IT 
> equipment
> and despite caveats the BBC are promoting waste and pollution - the junk will 
> be
> put in the council bins and go to landfill - not be disposed of properly.
>
>> It's more a question of "who would WANT to spend the hours putting a
>> drive back together just to get access to your £500 overdraft
>> facility" - ie a question of trouble / worth.
>
> Agreed, but as the report showed - destroying them is *hard* and dangerous.
> Simply erasing them is cheap and a lot safer!
>
> *AND* you can donate them to charity.
>
>> Me, I reformat them,
> And this is the flaw in your plan and the BBCs. "Reformatting" does not erase
> data. The BBC completely failed to say:
>  "You may think that reformatting works - you really need to use a special 
> disk
> eraser such as dban - otherwise you could find your second hand sale costing 
> you
> more than you could imagine."
>
>> Where's your problem?
>
> I hope that answers you?
>
>
> David
>
> --
> "Don't worry, you'll be fine; I saw it work in a cartoon once..."
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