Robert (Jamie) Munro wrote:
> David Greaves wrote:
>> So here we are, a month after Which? gave out the same dumb advice the BBC 
>> follows:
>>
>>   http://news.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/hi/technology/newsid_7910000/7910045.stm
>>
>> Sensationalist pillock :)
>>
>> I can't wait for someone to be seriously hurt trying to drill through a hard 
>> drive.
>>
>> FWIW:
>>   http://16systems.com/zero/index.html
> 
> I'm not an expert, but from my understanding of the theory, that
> challenge isn't offering anything like enough money. $500 is less than
> recovery companies charge for a normal recovery. I would have thought at
> least $10,000 is more like what you would need to offer, maybe more.
Ah, you didn't allow for the value of the coveted title...
  "King (or Queen) of Data Recovery"

> You'd need something like a magnetic force microscope,
<snip plot worthy of MacGyver...>

Err, that would be the point...

And given that your plot would even work, how many spods on eBay have access to
a magnetic force microscope?

Obviously the word spods includes BBC reporters (note, not "journalist")
incapable of entering
  "wiped disc recovery scanning electron paper"
into Google and getting as the second hit:
  http://sansforensics.wordpress.com/2009/01/15/overwriting-hard-drive-data/

Which makes a mockery of the whole thing (as do any number of other references
that are not obtained from companies making a living from BS).

For the lazy:
  The forensic recovery of data using electron microscopy is infeasible.

David


-- 
"Don't worry, you'll be fine; I saw it work in a cartoon once..."
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