Here is a contra I  have had success with new dancers - but only if they are 
doing really well on the other stuff - otherwise I avoid contras.
A1 - Cir L - dosido neighborA2 ladies dosido, gents dosidoB1 Long Liine for & 
back - 1s swing in centerB2 Down hall line of 4 - don't let go - back up -  
centers  (1s) arch - shoot 2s thru to new neighbors
They really need to understand 1s & 2s and when t change and how to wait out at 
the ends
With new dancers I only let them go down the hall 4 counts, back up 4 counts - 
then they have 8 counts to get the progression and get a new circle formed.  
Not how I would call it with experienced dancers.
Mac McKeever
    On Friday, March 29, 2019, 12:53:24 PM CDT, Bree Kalb via Callers 
<callers@lists.sharedweight.net> wrote:  
 
 Do Si Three by Linda Leslie is another excellent dance for newbies. It has 
progression and swings (I encourage elbow swings) and it doesn't matter a bit 
where one ends up. It's always been a great success when I've called it.

On Fri, Mar 29, 2019 at 11:02 AM Rich Sbardella via Callers 
<callers@lists.sharedweight.net> wrote:

Casey,
In a one hour gig with lots of newbies, I would suggest not using any 
progressive contras.  There are too many fun dances that usr similar basics 
without the complication of progression.  I have been hired to call such contra 
dances, but found the most success calling dances likes "Rakes of Mallow", La 
Bastringue, Rural Felicity, Heel & Toe Polka, etc.  Few people in the crowd 
understand what a "modern" contra dance is, they just want to move to the music.
Goodluck,Rich SbardellaStafford, CT
On Fri, Mar 29, 2019 at 10:05 AM Casey Carr via Callers 
<callers@lists.sharedweight.net> wrote:

  I would also start with a circle - teach giving weight, hand holds, 8 counts. 
 Might teach La Bastringue (keeping partners and 2 hand turn instead of swing). 
  I would definitely not teach swings in an hour - no ladies chains.   Just 
circles, stars, allemandes, dos si dos. 
  Depending on the crowd could start with Gallopede or Virginia Reel, then 
Family Contra would be perfect and end with another simple contra. 
  
  Casey Carr
  
  On 3/29/2019 8:52 AM, Liz Burkhart via Callers wrote:
  
 I have a gig coming up at a library wherein I have one hour to teach and call 
contra dances. It's a mixed crowd, and I heard there may be a lot of tweens 
present. I think I'd like to focus on bigger picture things - moving up and 
down the line, swinging, interacting with their set. I imagine I may even cut 
out courtesy turns in order to minimize the time we spend on the lesson. I've 
taught for small, mostly inexperienced crowds before but I usually have a lot 
more time. I'd really rather get them moving than to get bogged down in 
teaching. Does anyone have insight, suggestions, or advice? 
 
 Thanks,
 
 Liz Burkhart 
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