This week a Carolina Wren has been coming to our suet feeder sporadically every day. A Brown Creeper seems to spend most of mid-day every day on the box-elder outside our dining room window, making a stop on the snow below the feeders before each round up the tree-trunk. ( I want to hear him start to sing his tinkly song as the days lengthen, but with the windows closed, that's unlikely)

Other regulars: Red-br Nuthatch pair, White-br Nuthatch pair, Red-bellied Woodpeckers, Downy woodpecker, one Tree sparrow, BC Chickadees, T.Titmouse, House Finches, DEJuncos, N.Cardinals, Mourning Doves, Bluejays, four gray squirrels and one red squirrel. Earlier in the month we had one male Redpoll & for just one appearance, five Pine Siskins that did not return.

Looking at the sexual dimorphism of the woodpecker pairs versus the identical plumage of the nuthatches, chickadees, etc., I wondered whether there is any substantial discussion of how birds recognise their mates, or even gender in general? Is it known what birds look for ?

Nari Mistry,
Ellis Hollow Rd.

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Nari B. Mistry,
Ithaca, New York
For my paintings, see http://www.artbynari.com


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