We have had a hilariously raucous Blue Jay family around the yard the past couple of weeks or so (I failed to note the exact date that they started their residence). We also have a Chickadee family! I know we have several other species breeding here but it's easiest to notice the ones who come around the bird baths and feeders.

At Lime Hollow yesterday evening we were treated to several Towhee songs in different areas of the preserve. One from very close range who also let me see him. From close-by their song sounds very thrush-like and musical. If the mosquitoes hadn't been trying to exsanguinate me I would have stood there and listened until the bird flew off or stopped singing. So beautiful! He was also varying from the song I'm used to. Instead of "Drink your tea!" He sang, "Drink! Drink! [long pause, then extremely musical:] your Teeeeeaa!" Maybe that's not so unusual, but I don't remember hearing a Towhee do that variation of the song before. It was especially pretty.


But I have a question. As we were heading back toward the entrance I heard a bird singing near the semi-circular sculpture. This bird was singing with the more typical cadence of the phrase "Drink your tea!" of a Towhee, but each note was a clear whistle and the first two notes were the same pitch, with the last being approximately a fifth higher. Each note was of the same duration. I don't recall ever having heard that before, not that I'm great with bird songs. Any ideas what that bird might have been? There were many Grey Catbirds around but the vocal quality and style/pattern didn't sound like the Catbirds I hear on our property.

We also saw a number of Wood Ducks on one of the ponds.

Melanie

On 8/1/2017 5:08 PM, Geo Kloppel wrote:
Lots of hungry young birds around, but I especially feel for this fledgling 
Broad-winged Hawk, whose wails are not only piteous (all Broad-wings sound that 
way to me) but also right in my ears, because the bird favors the trees that 
shade my workshop.

Most years the Broad-wing fledglings take up begging stations several hundred 
yards away, overlooking secluded Maple Avenue, where their parents hunt, but 
this year is different for some reason...

-Geo
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