Thank you for being in touch! I will be in the field until September 19th with 
little or no internet and cell service. Thank you for your patience and I will 
be in touch when I return.
Sarah Blodgett Photography
sarahblodgett.com


On Jun 16, 2018, at 12:03 AM, Upstate NY Birding digest 
<cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu> wrote:

> CAYUGABIRDS-L Digest for Saturday, June 16, 2018.
> 
> 1. A question on Eastern Bluebirds trails
> 2. Re: A question on Eastern Bluebirds trails
> 3. Re: A question on Eastern Bluebirds trails
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Subject: A question on Eastern Bluebirds trails
> From: "Mona Bearor" <conservebi...@gmail.com>
> Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2018 15:13:08 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 1
> 
> In recent years it seems that Eastern Bluebird trails are raising more Tree
> Swallows than bluebirds if they are anywhere near water.  Has there been any
> research on whether we are artificially raising the numbers of Tree Swallows
> by placing bluebird nestboxes in proximity to water?
> 
> Mona Bearor
> 
> South Glens Falls
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Subject: Re: A question on Eastern Bluebirds trails
> From: John and Fritzie Blizzard <job121...@verizon.net>
> Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2018 17:21:23 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
> 
> With the decline in food supply (insects) over fields, thanks to 
> farmers' spraying, we have almost no swallows _of any kind_. I have one 
> pair now on eggs. Their first eggs were destroyed by a male house 
> sparrow.� I put a groc. bag over a nearby box to keep out the house 
> sparrows. Surprisingly, they have left the swallows alone since then but 
> for the 1st time I can recall, the male swallow seems to be going into 
> the box to sit on the eggs when the female leaves & is more alert at 
> being protective to chase away the sparrows.
> 
> I saw maybe all of 8 tree swallows here at home with 100 acres of fields 
> all around us this spring ....� & one barn swallow ... at MNWR.
> 
> Blue birds seem more inclined to look for larvae/worms than small flying 
> insects caught mid air. One of my boxes had a successful brood of 
> bluebirds as did 2 trees with holes in dead wood.� A chipmunk ran by me 
> 2 wks. ago with a bird in it's beak, probably taken from a nest in the 
> nearby spruce trees.� On the 12th, my daughter saw a chickadee come out 
> of a tiny hole in a dead tree carrying an egg sac. I saw it yesterday. I 
> was afraid the striped rats (chipmunks) had discovered the hole & 
> managed to get the adult &/or babies. I read a study several yrs. ago 
> saying that chipmunks are by far the most destructive of any animals 
> combined when it comes to killing birds.
> 
> Be gentle ....
> 
> Fritzie
> 
> On 6/15/2018 3:13 PM, Mona Bearor wrote:
> 
> In recent years it seems that Eastern Bluebird trails are raising more 
> Tree Swallows than bluebirds if they are anywhere near water.� Has 
> there been any research on whether we are artificially raising the 
> numbers of Tree Swallows by placing bluebird nestboxes in proximity to 
> water?
> 
> Mona Bearor
> 
> South Glens Falls
> 
> -
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Subject: Re: A question on Eastern Bluebirds trails
> From: Nancy Cusumano <nancycusuman...@gmail.com>
> Date: Fri, 15 Jun 2018 19:11:59 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 3
> 
> I am on Dubois Rd, between Rt 96 and 89, near Jacksonville and we have
> plenty of swallows and blue birds both. We have lots of farm land, but they
> do less spraying (thankfully). I do agree that some species are really
> taking a hit this year, though. We had two sets of nesting Carolina wrens,
> neither of which were successful. Seems like we have less chickadees and
> nuthatches as well. And the chipmunks are my nemesis. We have a yard full
> of old black locust trees that are riddled with cavities. There are 5
> species of woodpecker we saw courting and mating, but so far no sign of
> young. I hope they are all ok too. Oh, and our very fist house sparrow in a
> nest box!
> 
> The only birds that seem to have an advantage are the Orioles, of which
> there are more than I have ever seen in the area.
> 
> One funny anecdote, I was walking on the black diamond trail a little while
> ago and looked up to find the cedar waxwings I was hearing eating cherries.
> In the middle of this big old cherry tree were two sleeping raccoons! They
> did not move a muscle, maybe with a belly full of fruit they were having
> their siesta. Pretty funny sight!
> 
> Enjoy,
> 
> Nancy
> 
> 
> 
> Cayuga Dog Rescue has saved more than 578! dogs since 2005!
> Learn more at cayugadogrescue.org
> 
> On Fri, Jun 15, 2018 at 5:21 PM, John and Fritzie Blizzard <
> job121...@verizon.net> wrote:
> 
> With the decline in food supply (insects) over fields, thanks to farmers'
> spraying, we have almost no swallows *of any kind*. I have one pair now
> on eggs. Their first eggs were destroyed by a male house sparrow.� I put
> a groc. bag over a nearby box to keep out the house sparrows. Surprisingly,
> they have left the swallows alone since then but for the 1st time I can
> recall, the male swallow seems to be going into the box to sit on the eggs
> when the female leaves & is more alert at being protective to chase away
> the sparrows.
> 
> I saw maybe all of 8 tree swallows here at home with 100 acres of fields
> all around us this spring ....� & one barn swallow ... at MNWR.�
> 
> Blue birds seem more inclined to look for larvae/worms than small flying
> insects caught mid air. One of my boxes had a successful brood of bluebirds
> as did 2 trees with holes in dead wood.� A chipmunk ran by me 2 wks. ago
> with a bird in it's beak, probably taken from a nest in the nearby spruce
> trees.� On the 12th, my daughter saw a chickadee come out of a tiny hole
> in a dead tree carrying an egg sac. I saw it yesterday. I was afraid the
> striped rats (chipmunks) had discovered the hole & managed to get the adult
> &/or babies. I read a study several yrs. ago saying that chipmunks are by
> far the most destructive of any animals combined when it comes to killing
> birds.
> 
> Be gentle ....
> 
> Fritzie
> On 6/15/2018 3:13 PM, Mona Bearor wrote:
> 
> In recent years it seems that Eastern Bluebird trails are raising more
> Tree Swallows than bluebirds if they are anywhere near water.� Has there
> been any research on whether we are artificially raising the numbers of
> Tree Swallows by placing bluebird nestboxes in proximity to water?
> 
> Mona Bearor
> 
> South Glens Falls
> -
> 
> 
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