I have used pokeweed berries in my forest kindergarten class to dye wool an
intensely beautiful shade of purple. 5-6-7 year olds, harvested, crushed,
boiled over a campfire and stirred the pot full of wool roving and pokeweed
berries. My students love knowing which plants are deadly poisonous. I have
taught them a lot about mushrooms, and all of them can identify a
destroying angel, jack o'lanterns, etc. Knowledge is power, and children
love having this knowledge. They know where all the pokeweed plants are at
Lime Hollow and love to inform people about them.

 But this is a bird list, and the question is about bird behavior...I'd
love to hear about the OP's question re American Robin aggression if anyone
knows more about that.
Maryfaith Decker Miller

On Sat, Oct 26, 2019 at 11:38 AM <anneb.cl...@gmail.com> wrote:

> And I am living proof that eating young pokeweed is not deadly. We didn’t
> use 3 waters either, although drained it.
> But I am NOT suggesting everyone try it. Young spinach causes less panic.
> Or try lambs quarters.
> Anne
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:56 AM, Regi Teasley <rltcay...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> I understand Pokeweed is poisonous to humans.  Your thoughts on keeping
> these plants?
>
> Regi
>
>
> *What good is a house if you don’t have a tolerable planet to put it in?
> Henry David Thoreau*
>
> On Oct 26, 2019, at 9:01 AM, anneb.cl...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> 
> This morning I have a large number of robins all age/sexes foraging on my
> productive pokeweed berries and scratching leaves AND chasing each other
> hard and long.  More athletic long chases than I am used to associating
> with robins.
>
> They are not just chasing around the berries although I watched some head
> lowered face offs ( before a chase) on the fence near pokeweed.
>
> Anne
> Sent from my iPhone
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