“Young Cowbirds won’t you come out tonight? Come out tonight? Come out 
tonight....
And dance by the light of the moon.” 🎼

____________
Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone 
or weary of life.  Rachel Carson.


> On Apr 12, 2020, at 4:47 PM, Magnus Fiskesjo <magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu> 
> wrote:
> 
> 
> Thanks! Yes Indeed it seems that in the 2015 study, cowbird youngsters 
> (*fledglings*) were *spending the night away* from their slave parents and 
> then return *not* to the *nest* but to the foster parents' location -- for 
> more slave feeding. This scenario does make more sense, yes, so it may well 
> be I misremembered about the *nest* part. The *fledglings* going out on their 
> own would also resolve, perhaps, John Confer's points of doubt about body 
> temperature. 
> 
> But note, that we are not up to date, yet -- the 2015 publication was 
> apparently superseded by new research which expanded, to discover the 
> "teenager party" as reported in Living Bird, I believe some time in 2017-2019 
> -- that is, about young cowbirds *not* sitting in the dark (which makes 
> little or no sense, to me, at least! why would they do that?), but hanging 
> out with young cowbird peers which would enable them to build cowbirdness. To 
> me it looks like this additional discovery was not yet made in 2015 -- so in 
> that study they mistakenly concluded that the young cowbird was sitting alone 
> in the dark, instead of going to his peer party. 
> 
> If I do find it again, I'll forward it. 
> 
> --If anyone on this list has a digital copy already, please post a copy. 
> 
> Many thanks again, over and out for now, 
> Magnus
> --
> Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
> Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University
> McGraw Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
> E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu
> ________________________________________
> From: AB Clark [anneb.cl...@gmail.com]
> Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2020 10:14 AM
> To: Magnus Fiskesjo
> Cc: John Confer; CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: Re: "Juvenile cowbirds sneak out at night" - RE: [cayugabirds-l] 
> Cowbirds
> 
> At the risk of making this a longer-than-wanted discussion, I will briefly 
> answer—and then retreat!
> 
> I just read Magnus’  report on Louder et al’s study from U Illinois and 
> downloaded the actual paper and here is the story.  No one is leaving at 3 
> am!  Or flying out of a nest as a nestling.  Too much fine grained 
> terminology is leading to misunderstandings, but it is a fascinating paper.
> 
> SO—the question that the researchers were interested in was whether actual 
> biological mothers of young cowbirds were somehow leading their own 
> fledglings away from the Host-parents territory.  The answer is NO.  But the 
> FLEDGLINGS (juveniles that have left the nest and are flying, at about 10-20 
> days old) are often leaving on their own, at dusk, to ROOST (sit in the dark) 
> away from their foster-parents territories, but still returning to those 
> territories in daytime.
> 
> The confusions come in because they put the little radios on the cowbird 
> young on about the last day when they were still in their host-nests as 
> NESTLINGS, but the observations they report were all on FLEDGLINGS, young 
> that had left their nests, never to return.  In Icterids, nestlings do not 
> leave flighted, but they can flutter and can cling and climb with strong well 
> developed legs.  From what I remember, young cowbirds develop a little faster 
> than some.  So maybe they fly as early as 5-6 days after fledging—I have to 
> check.
> 
> But it is during the later FLEDGLING stage, out of the nests and mobile, that 
> they start to disappear off foster-territory in the evening.  Sunset isn’t 
> dark, so they can still move easily;  apparently motivated by whatever gets a 
> cowbird to become a cowbird, they often left to roost alone, during the next 
> 3 weeks of still being associated with foster-parents during the day.  And 
> their non-doting cowbird mothers don’t have anything to do with it, because 
> they were also being tracked by radios and triangulating receiver towers, and 
> mom-cowbirds were not present during these movements.
> 
> Did it bring juvenile cowbirds into contact with other cowbirds?  Apparently 
> not, at that stage.  But the “go away, young man/cowbird” urge was already 
> present.
> 
> 
> So thanks, Magnus, for bringing our attention to this really interesting 
> report!  (I can send it to anyone who wants to read it!)
> 
> Anne
> 
> Anne B Clark
> 147 Hile School Rd
> Freeville, NY 13068
> 607-222-0905
> anneb.cl...@gmail.com<mailto:anneb.cl...@gmail.com>
> 
> 
> 
> On Apr 11, 2020, at 10:02 PM, Magnus Fiskesjo 
> <magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu<mailto:magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
> 
> 
> Thanks. Yes it's curious and hard-to-believe and I think that's why I 
> remember so clearly reading about this in the Lab of O's Living Bird member's 
> magazine, but as I said, can't find that article online--perhaps it is only 
> in their printed version which I must have read 2017 or later. AllAboutBird 
> account is much earlier, 2009, and does not bring up what must be some NEW 
> research ( 
> https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/if-brown-headed-cowbirds-are-reared-by-other-species-how-do-they-know-they-are-cowbirds-when-they-grow-up/
>  ).
> 
> Regardless, just now a friend sent me this 2015 report below, which mentions 
> the SAME strange observations that I believe I read in Living Bird -- with 
> minor differences: this report mentions chicks as nightly departing foster 
> nests after sunset, not 3am, BUT returning only at dawn; also, it says the 
> nightly escape is solitary, NOT to congregate with other young cowbirds in a 
> 'teenager party' as I remember from Living Bird (which also said that the 
> field congregation was only revealed to Science after new tracking that was 
> launched only once researchers had found that the cowbird chick they 
> monitored was missing from its nest at night! So, maybe the 'teenager party' 
> was only found out after simultaneously tracking several youngsters?)
> 
> Anyhow, here goes:
> 
> https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151102152607.htm
> 
> Science News
> 
> Juvenile cowbirds sneak out at night
> Date:    November 2, 2015
> Source:    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
> 
> A new study explores how a young cowbird, left as an egg in the nest of a 
> different species, grows up to know it's a cowbird and not a warbler, thrush 
> or sparrow.
> 
> The study, published in Animal Behaviour, reveals that cowbird juveniles 
> leave the host parents at dusk and spend their nights in nearby fields, 
> returning just after daybreak. This behavior likely plays a role in the 
> cowbirds' ability to avoid imprinting on their host parents.
> 
> "If I took a chickadee and I put it in a titmouse nest, the chickadee would 
> start learning the song of the titmouse and it would actually learn the 
> titmouse behaviors," said Matthew Louder, who conducted the study as a Ph.D. 
> student with Illinois Natural History Survey avian ecologist Jeff Hoover and 
> INHS biological surveys coordinator Wendy Schelsky. "And then, when it was 
> old enough, the chickadee would prefer to mate with the titmouse, which would 
> be an evolutionary dead end," he said.
> 
> Louder is now a postdoctoral researcher with East Carolina University in 
> North Carolina and Hunter College in New York.
> 
> The imprinting process is widespread among birds and other animals, but brood 
> parasites like the cowbird appear to be resistant to imprinting. They will 
> imprint on a different species if confined with that species for an extended 
> period of time in a cage, but the birds don't appear to do so in the wild.
> 
> Cowbird hosts, such as the prothonotary warblers in this study, have their 
> own habits and habitats, and seldom choose to live where the cowbirds live or 
> eat what they eat. Prothonotary warblers, for example, live in forests and 
> dine on insects and caterpillars. Cowbirds spend most of their adult lives in 
> open fields and prairies, and while they do eat insects, about three-quarters 
> of their diet consists of seeds.
> 
> "Among other things, cowbirds have got to learn to eat like cowbirds or 
> they're not going to survive very long," Hoover said.
> 
> The researchers wanted to test the hypothesis that cowbird moms are the ones 
> that lead their offspring out of the forest. There was some support for this 
> idea. A recent study from the same team found that cowbird females don't 
> simply abandon their eggs in another species' nest. They pay attention to 
> whether the young birds survive, sometimes wrecking the nests of birds that 
> kick the cowbird eggs out of their nests.
> 
> The cowbird females also return to nests where young cowbirds survived to 
> fledging age. Cowbird females are often spotted in the vicinity of cowbird 
> nestlings, Schelsky said, and sometimes respond (with vocalizations, not 
> food) to the nestlings' begging calls.
> 
> To track the birds in the forest and prairie, the researchers put radio 
> telemetry transmitters on the cowbird nestlings and on adult female cowbirds 
> in the forest where the host parents made their nests. The team took blood 
> from the birds and conducted genetic analyses to match the juveniles (and 
> their radio signals) to their biological mothers.
> 
> But tracking the birds, even with the radio transmitters, was next to 
> impossible, Louder said. He tried for a year, but was unable to get 
> meaningful data. Then study co-author Michael Ward, a professor of natural 
> resources and environmental sciences at the University of Illinois, came up 
> with a new approach.
> 
> "He helped construct an automated telemetry system," Louder said. "We put up 
> three radio towers, each with six antennas on it, so you have 360-degree 
> directional coverage. All three towers track one individual cowbird at a time 
> and then move to the next individual."
> 
> With this system, Louder could track the location of each study bird every 
> one-to-two minutes.
> 
> "We were able to watch the juveniles and see if they left the forest at the 
> same time as a female and, if so, whether that female was their mom," he said.
> 
> "Strangely enough, the juveniles did not follow the females out of the 
> forest," Louder said. Instead, they left on their own, after dark, returning 
> only the following morning, he said.
> 
> "I started seeing this in the data and I thought it was wrong," Louder said. 
> So he went to the forest and followed a single juvenile cowbird for one 
> night. The bird left the forest in the evening, moving to a rosebush on the 
> adjacent prairie. It was out there all night, alone.
> 
> "As soon as the sun came up, the juvenile flew back into the forest and to 
> the warbler's territory," Louder said. "Without the automated radio 
> telemetry, I would have assumed that it had stayed in the forest all night."
> 
> The discovery doesn't explain how cowbirds find their way into a cowbird 
> flock, where they learn most of their social and survival skills and 
> eventually find a mate. But it does offer some insight into the processes 
> that allow young cowbirds to avoid imprinting on their hosts, the researchers 
> said.
> 
> "Clearly, there's a lot more to these birds than people would have thought," 
> Hoover said. "We still have more layers to peel away from this onion that is 
> the cowbird."
> 
> 
> Story Source:
> Materials provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Original 
> written by Diana Yates. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.
> 
> Journal Reference:
>   Matthew I.M. Louder, Michael P. Ward, Wendy M. Schelsky, Mark E. Hauber, 
> Jeffrey P. Hoover. Out on their own: a test of adult-assisted dispersal in 
> fledgling brood parasites reveals solitary departures from hosts. Animal 
> Behaviour, 2015; 110: 29 DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2015.09.009
> [= 
> https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0003347215003401?via%3Dihub
>   ]
> 
> Cite This Page:
> University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. "Juvenile cowbirds sneak out at 
> night." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 November 2015. 
> <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/11/151102152607.htm>.
> 
> 
> -End quote.
> 
> --sincerely,
> Magnus Fiskesjö, PhD
> Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, Cornell University
> McGraw Hall, Room 201. Ithaca, NY 14853, USA
> E-mail: magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu, or: n...@cornell.edu
> 
> Affiliations at Cornell University, WWW:
> Anthropology Department, https://anthropology.cornell.edu/anthropology-faculty
> Southeast Asia Program (SEAP), https://seap.einaudi.cornell.edu/people/faculty
> East Asia Program (EAP), http://eap.einaudi.cornell.edu/people/core-faculty
> CIAMS (Archaeology), https://archaeology.cornell.edu/faculty
> Cornell Institute for Public Affairs (CIPA), 
> cipa.cornell.edu/academics/fieldfaculty.cfm
> Judith Reppy Institute for Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS), 
> http://pacs.einaudi.cornell.edu/people/steering-committee
> _________________
> ________________________________________
> From: John Confer [con...@ithaca.edu]
> Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 7:47 PM
> To: Magnus Fiskesjo; CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cowbirds
> 
> I, also, wonder about this report. I've had to handle nestlings for research 
> purposes, always with fear and the most care possible. Nestlings don't stay 
> in nests any longer than absolutely necessary because nests are depredated by 
> raccoon, cat, weasel, skunk, raptors, etc. Nestlings generally can't leave 
> any earlier because they don't have sufficient feathers for insulation nor 
> muscle strength to move around. Further, since they don't thermoregulate 
> until just about the day they leave, they would have a hard time surviving in 
> the lower temperatures of night. 3 to 4 to 5 AM is usually the coldest time 
> of the 24 hr cycle, often 20-30-40 degrees colder than mid-day. This doesn't 
> makes sense to me.
> 
> It is a pretty image.
> 
> John
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: bounce-124540618-25065...@list.cornell.edu 
> <bounce-124540618-25065...@list.cornell.edu> on behalf of Magnus Fiskesjo 
> <magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu>
> Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 10:10 AM
> To: AB Clark <anneb.cl...@gmail.com>
> Cc: Michael H. Goldstein <michael.goldst...@cornell.edu>; CAYUGABIRDS-L 
> <cayugabird...@list.cornell.edu>
> Subject: RE: [cayugabirds-l] Cowbirds
> 
> This message originated from outside the Ithaca College email system.
> 
> 
> Hi, I would love to know, and I sure wish I could find that article. I 
> definitely recall that it said the cowbird chicks that were studied left 
> their nest like 3am to go to the field ("party"), and then came back to the 
> nest before dawn, to continue to pretend to be their slave parent's child!
> 
> Of course later they'll not sit in the nest any more, and wander around while 
> being fed, I've seen that. And yes I am sure you are right about most of the 
> other things you noted! I maybe should not have said "teenager", -- that was 
> my word choice, not that of the scholars whose research was reported in that 
> Living Bird magazine article.  I used "teenager" because the cowbird nightly 
> field party seemed to be a ... teenager's dance party.
> 
> Maybe someone else knows the URL for the actual article. I can't find it, I 
> must have read it in print only.
> 
> This rather memorable article also talked about other astounding discoveries 
> such as that the catbird is the only bird that can resist the cowbird's 
> trickery. Unlike other birds, it said, the catbird will expel every egg that 
> looks different from its first egg. So, the cowbirds can only outsmart it by 
> laying their egg in the catbirds' new nest before even mama catbird has laid 
> her first egg there. If it can, then the catbird will expel her own eggs, one 
> after the other. And if the cowbird scheme fails, it might rip up the nest 
> (as revenge).
> 
> --yrs.,
> Magnus Fiskesjö
> n...@cornell.edu
> ________________________________________
> From: AB Clark [anneb.cl...@gmail.com]
> Sent: Saturday, April 11, 2020 9:30 AM
> To: Magnus Fiskesjo
> Cc: Michael H. Goldstein; CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cowbirds
> 
> I wonder if there has been some mis-intepretation either in the article or by 
> subsequent readers.  Cowbird young, like other passerines, leave the nest in 
> the care of parents (foster or otherwise) and live outside the nest from then 
> on.  (OK individuals may hop outside during the day and return at night for 
> the day or two over which they fledge.)  Care for cowbirds in the fledgling 
> stage lasts a similar time to their relatives, red-winged blackbirds and 
> other smallish icterids.  They should be fed and be following or calling to 
> parents over the next 12-14 days, not joining older cowbirds.  Teenagers 
> would be perhaps yearling cowbirds?  It is later, in summer and fall, when 
> young cowbirds are independent of parents, that they flock up with other 
> cowbirds and blackbirds.
> 
> I haven’t heard anything about 3 am gatherings from Meredith or her students. 
>  Seems pretty dark for any such passerine to be moving.  West and King 
> studied them in aviaries and it could be that researchers got up at 3 am to 
> set up and be there when singing started to happen.  But in any case, cowbird 
> song learning is a fascinating situation where the basic songs are clearly 
> not learned from parents during late nestling or early fledgling periods, 
> i.e. develop “innately”, but  are socially modified in a number of ways, 
> feedback from female cowbirds and from competing male cowbirds both.  West 
> and King published several really nice overviews in accessible papers, 
> Scientific American or American Scientist, I believe.
> 
> By the way, there is at least one video-documented report of a hatchling 
> cowbird behaving like cuckoos and butting host eggs out of the nest.
> 
> 
> Anne B Clark
> 147 Hile School Rd
> Freeville, NY 13068
> 607-222-0905
> anneb.cl...@gmail.com<mailto:anneb.cl...@gmail.com>
> 
> 
> 
> On Apr 11, 2020, at 9:11 AM, Magnus Fiskesjo 
> <magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu<mailto:magnus.fiske...@cornell.edu>> wrote:
> 
> This morning, a male cowbird singing, at Salt Point. Never heard that before. 
> A very low volume series of thin crispy notes. No clucking, as in some 
> recordings of its song.
> 
> The bird sat very close, on top of the little pine/fur tree at the lakeside 
> fork of the path to the Bluebird Path.
> 
> It refused to leave its perch and continued singing even as I stood right 
> under the tree.
> 
> Ps. the weirdest cowbird research for me was the Living Bird piece reporting 
> on how a cowbird knows it is a cowbird, and not a whatever other bird, 
> despite being raised by them as slave parents. It was discovered that the 
> grown chick gets up at 3am and leaves the slaving foster parents' nest, to go 
> hang out with other teenager cowbirds in a nearby field. Next question is, 
> how do hey know that they should get out of bed at 3am and go to the field 
> party and get to know their cowbirdness?
> ps. I could not find the reference to the Living Bird magazine article where 
> I read this. I only find this partial account, also interesting but no 
> mention of the teenager party:
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.allaboutbirds.org%2Fnews%2Fif-brown-headed-cowbirds-are-reared-by-other-species-how-do-they-know-they-are-cowbirds-when-they-grow-up%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430445371&amp;sdata=qSkhspt%2BrENXqrmr5gv%2F5EnKw%2Fe8lssr9wjNCqZMaT0%3D&amp;reserved=0
> 
> --
> Magnus Fiskesjö
> n...@cornell.edu
> _________________________________
> From: bounce-124539965-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
> [bounce-124539965-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Michael H. 
> Goldstein [michael.goldst...@cornell.edu]
> Sent: Friday, April 10, 2020 8:05 PM
> To: CAYUGABIRDS-L
> Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Cowbirds
> 
> Cowbirds are crazier than you think…check out the research by Meredith West 
> and Andrew King on the role of female cowbirds (who don’t sing) in shaping 
> the development of juvenile males' song by using rapid wing gestures:  
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http:%2F%2Fwww.indiana.edu%2F~aviary%2FResearch%2Ffemale%2520visual%2520displays.pdf&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430455372&amp;sdata=XdPriXo%2BzVrVgjdFjNb3Yo%2FXS7Uj3GGF2iCnLCbniu4%3D&amp;reserved=0
>  and more generally, 
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http:%2F%2Fwww.indiana.edu%2F~aviary%2FPublications.htm&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C0%7C637222110430455372&amp;sdata=xtWADdPzoRH4NXGPX3EgFrRrBFRG%2FfzdG96Ucbrtmmw%3D&amp;reserved=0
> 
> Cheers,
> Mike
> 
> 
> 
> On Apr 10, 2020, at 7:49 PM, Peter Saracino 
> <petersarac...@gmail.com<mailto:petersarac...@gmail.com>> wrote:
> 
> I was having a cup of coffee looking out the window at 3 male and 3 female 
> cowbirds going at the sunflower seeds. As I watched them it dawned on me that 
> all of them were raised by foster parents!!!
> According to the Lab of O:
> "the cowbird does not depend exclusively on a single host species; it has 
> been known to parasitize over 220 different species of North American birds".
> Crazy, wild stuff.
> Pete Sar
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and 
> Basics<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.northeastbirding.com%2FCayugabirdsWELCOME&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430455372&amp;sdata=YBc0zAbfcuHW45Yx%2FhymfcgRYopgrTX5HMU5zg%2FBbVg%3D&amp;reserved=0>
> Rules and 
> Information<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.northeastbirding.com%2FCayugabirdsRULES&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430455372&amp;sdata=X7cYv2R5jFMSYzlJNv9q%2BOekd4cpB2oRFAjIXXnJK6o%3D&amp;reserved=0>
> Subscribe, Configuration and 
> Leave<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.northeastbirding.com%2FCayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430455372&amp;sdata=OTXEy%2BMxvrLK%2FmrIIj1o1JUT%2BSL3urVy9nKmsZ1Ax1Q%3D&amp;reserved=0>
> Archives:
> The Mail 
> Archive<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mail-archive.com%2Fcayugabirds-l%40cornell.edu%2Fmaillist.html&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430455372&amp;sdata=ZLdytExR8Ou9bonGHjUJsyGxP2doQcZ37A%2FAZf8lLg8%3D&amp;reserved=0>
> Surfbirds<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.surfbirds.com%2Fbirdingmail%2FGroup%2FCayugabirds&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C0%7C637222110430455372&amp;sdata=AdNsZB5WT9MUfdgTZVUqvfBmk4HIfPvM%2F1cX66HjaHM%3D&amp;reserved=0>
> BirdingOnThe.Net<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbirdingonthe.net%2Fmailinglists%2FCAYU.html&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430455372&amp;sdata=XIBFK84URmGy2dU%2BZm9mKQ1%2Fu9iM1o2NnhF6VkpVy0w%3D&amp;reserved=0>
> Please submit your observations to 
> eBird<https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fcontent%2Febird%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430455372&amp;sdata=ZTwmUkGnF%2F0S0AtZ%2FqtFYoHFPUa82bPdgsYQJ%2BKNYAM%3D&amp;reserved=0>!
> --
> 
> _______________________________________________________________
> Michael H. Goldstein
> Associate Professor
> Director, Eleanor J. Gibson Laboratory of Developmental Psychology
> Director, College Scholar Program
> Department of Psychology, Cornell University
> 270 Uris Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853
> 
> Office 607-793-0537;  Lab 607-254-BABY;  Fax 607-255-8433
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fpsychology.cornell.edu%2Fmichael-h-goldstein&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430465361&amp;sdata=FcDZVTAmO73WoqYIpbdXJl6O0Se5octI6s5u11JR36U%3D&amp;reserved=0
> 
> Cornell B.A.B.Y. Lab:  
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbabylab.cornell.edu%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430465361&amp;sdata=vIZ47icegHm8GCz3laXN7ZU%2F8YoQISyw3mFVwRkPBII%3D&amp;reserved=0
> _______________________________________________________________
> 
> --
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.northeastbirding.com%2FCayugabirdsWELCOME&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430465361&amp;sdata=Vrr3Q6YkFDRF%2BZbO4GQdFwzf10oauPIOLouKBoqhTVM%3D&amp;reserved=0
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.northeastbirding.com%2FCayugabirdsRULES&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430465361&amp;sdata=1%2FOBwtxoYlD7jndECxGkatyImEucbLde85svRsAk2x8%3D&amp;reserved=0
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.northeastbirding.com%2FCayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430475364&amp;sdata=KjtFuczE%2FnlyZQW4OC3Wg8z7CZFIgcB9UN1FIHD30cc%3D&amp;reserved=0
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) 
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mail-archive.com%2Fcayugabirds-l%40cornell.edu%2Fmaillist.html&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430475364&amp;sdata=q1ajrBkWdOupSmcJy9DoAmEYRuFOCqNfBIsFJvFVGrI%3D&amp;reserved=0
> 2) 
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.surfbirds.com%2Fbirdingmail%2FGroup%2FCayugabirds&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C0%7C637222110430475364&amp;sdata=A%2FQu1cWlniXLSdgrFO7a%2BGdqBLnjlOVBoofPLkbeM2Q%3D&amp;reserved=0
> 3) 
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fbirdingonthe.net%2Fmailinglists%2FCAYU.html&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430475364&amp;sdata=8eLwsV1Zxio9oe3%2BO2e7iQ6Tm0HnxlFo0veKB7ZcgKI%3D&amp;reserved=0
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Febird.org%2Fcontent%2Febird%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cconfer%40ithaca.edu%7Cb0c382615f8d447374fb08d7de221e28%7Cfa1ac8f65e5448579f0b4aa422c09689%7C0%7C1%7C637222110430475364&amp;sdata=Ny8L%2F7xCBv9wuKkbqGQMYz8GButx78WZCeft6yyXd%2F8%3D&amp;reserved=0
> 
> --
> 
> --
> 
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> 
> 
> 
> --
> 
> Cayugabirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
> 3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> 

--

Cayugabirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsWELCOME
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsRULES
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/CayugabirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/cayugabirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/Cayugabirds
3) http://birdingonthe.net/mailinglists/CAYU.html

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Reply via email to