I have a sea flush and use it.  It works but is not necessary.

Like others I have installed a tee.  It has a garden hose fitting and cap
to allow easy connections.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B8pEh5lnvP1yYURDZGRKWWhpdzA/view?usp=drivesdk

With this orientation the tee provides the ability to attach a short
section of hose which can be used to suck out a bottle of glycol.  That
same hose easily extends above the water line allowing for the use of a
ramrod to clear a clogged through hull.  Put a second end on this hose and
it can be easily connected to the boat's freshwater system allowing for a
freshwater flush.  Same hose can be directed to suck from the bilge.  While
on the hard this same hose can allow engine operations by connecting to a
garden hose.

The process goes something like this:
Before adding glycol I warm the engine up.  Then I use a shop-vac to blow
the lines clear.  Using the aforementioned hose I can blow the hose to the
through hull clear while simultaneously blowing down the engine.  Once I
can hear the bubbles coming out of the thru-hull then I shut it.  Now all
the force is blowing down the engine.  After about a minute I can feel a
difference in the back pressure.  Now I prepare to add glycol.  I start the
engine and add the amount of glycol which gives me peace of mind.  I am
comfortable with whatever amount is needed in order to see it discharge.
 (If prepared and desired this is now the time to fog the engine by
spraying fogging oil into the intake.)  Shut off the engine.  While the
engine is hot I change the oil.  If keeping the boat in the water for the
winter, it is a good idea to disconnect the exhaust manifold to prevent the
loop seal in the wet muffler from drawing condensation into the engine
resulting in possible stuck rings.  Fogging will also help prevent stuck
rings and corrosion during the layup period.  If power is available during
the layup you might consider installing a block heater.  This further
drives out condensation inside and outside the engine.

Josh Muckley
S/V Sea Hawk
1989 C&C 37+
Solomons, MD



On Aug 5, 2017 8:48 AM, "Ron Ricci via CnC-List" <cnc-list@cnc-list.com>
wrote:

> Each year, I struggle with pulling a hose off my raw water strainer to
> flush anti-freeze through the system.  I’ve considered installing a tee in
> the line.  Recently I came across an adaptor (Sea Flush) that fits in the
> top of most any raw water strainer but it didn’t look like there was enough
> vertical clearance.  There is an adaptor for a Groco strainer but my C&C
> 37+ with a Yanmar 3HM35F appears to have a Perko 0493 Size 5 strainer.  I
> contacted Perko who indicated that I could convert my 0493 strainer to a
> 0593 model which has a flush valve and hose connection on the top.
> Unfortunately, it looks like I’d need about $250 worth of parts to make
> this work.  I’ve heard that a second cap for the strainer could be modified
> by installing a hose fitting.  The cap costs about $35.
>
>
>
> I’m curious what other listers have done and if I’m right on the strainer
> model #.
>
>
>
> Regards,
>
> *Ron*
>
> Ron Ricci
>
> S/V Patriot
>
> C&C 37+
>
> Bristol, RI
>
> ron.ri...@1968.usna.com
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
>
> This list is supported by the generous donations of our members. If you
> wish to make a contribution to offset our costs, please go to:
> https://www.paypal.me/stumurray
>
> All Contributions are greatly appreciated!
>
>
_______________________________________________

This list is supported by the generous donations of our members. If you wish to 
make a contribution to offset our costs, please go to:  
https://www.paypal.me/stumurray

All Contributions are greatly appreciated!

Reply via email to