William Allen Simpson wrote:
> The whole point of a notary is to bind a document to a
> person.  That the person submitted two or more
> different documents at different times is readily
> observable.  After all, the notary has the
> document(s)!

The notary does not want to have the documents, or to
have the necessary apparatus to produce them on demand.
Actually existent notaries do not keep the documents.

Again, you are trying to invent a protocol that works
around the flaws in MD5.  No doubt a competent engineer
can create such a protocol, but a competent engineer
would much prefer not to have flaws he needs to work
around.

Further, there is a long history of cryptographic
disasters, such as WiFi, where supposedly competent
engineers set to working around flaws, and instead
created more and bigger flaws.  Even if someone really
is a competent engineer, and perfectly capable of
producing a protocol that works around the known flaws,
it is hard for anyone else to tell if he really is
competent enough to work around the flaws, or has
produced, like WiFi and so many Microsoft projects, an
even bigger hole than that which he was trying to fix.

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