On 10/15/2016 12:32 AM, Evil incarnate wrote:

>       Before producing data in response to a government
>       request, we make sure it strictly follows the law, for example
>       to compel us to disclose content in criminal cases we require
>       the government use a search warrant, and that it complies with
>       Google's strict policies (to prevent overreach that can
>       compromise users' privacy).


Two words: "FISC Court", over-rides all that crap. Last year the court
passed EVERY SINGLE ORDER of the thousands put before it.

Don't believe the LIES. FiveEyes DOES NOT ALLOW a digital
right-to-privacy from their snooping. Never did... Even before teh
intertubz, never will.

As George Carlin put it: "You have owners."

Rr

> Google: Building on Surveillance Reform
> 
> https://blog.google/topics/public-policy/building-surveillance-reform/
> 
>       Today, we've updated our Transparency Report on government
>       requests for user data.  Globally, we received 44,943
>       government requests for information regarding 76,713 accounts
>       during the first half of 2016.  We provided user information
>       in response to 64% of those requests, which remains unchanged
>       from the previous reporting period (i.e. the second half of
>       2015).  We also received our first ever requests from the
>       following countries: Algeria, Belarus, Cayman Islands, El
>       Salvador, Fiji, and Saudi Arabia. In addition, pursuant to the
>       USA Freedom Act, the FBI lifted a gag restriction on an NSL
>       issued in the second half of 2015.  To reflect this, we have
>       updated the range of NSLs received in that period -- July to
>       December 2015 -- from 0-499 to 1-499.  As we have noted in the
>       past, when we receive a request for user information, we
>       review it carefully and only provide information within the
>       scope and authority of the request.  The privacy and security
>       of the data that users store with Google is central to our
>       approach.  Before producing data in response to a government
>       request, we make sure it strictly follows the law, for example
>       to compel us to disclose content in criminal cases we require
>       the government use a search warrant, and that it complies with
>       Google's strict policies (to prevent overreach that can
>       compromise users' privacy).
> 
> --Lauren--
> 

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