El 19/02/2019 a las 4:16, Russ Allbery escribió:

> Unfortunately, I took a closer look, and it turns out that this command
> was never safe.  It also allows arbitrary code excution on the server
> side if the client can write to $HOME.  This is because:
>
>    --config=FILE
>           This specifies an alternate config file than the default.  This
>           is only relevant when --daemon is specified.  The default is
>           /etc/rsyncd.conf unless the daemon is running over a remote
>           shell program and the remote user is not the super-user; in that
>           case the default is rsyncd.conf in the current directory
>           (typically $HOME).
>
> That behavior of loading rsyncd.conf from the current directory was the
> piece I had missed before.

Well, in my case I had the following setting in rsyncd.conf:

path = /backup/synology

where path points to a different directory which is NOT $home nor
doesn't permit to reach $home.

So you cannot overwrite /home/synology/rsyncd.conf.

Well... provided that "path" config is not affected by path traversal
("../../home/synology"). At least, what I understand from rsyncd.conf
manual is that it shouldn't be possible:

**path**
    This parameter specifies the directory in the daemon's filesystem to
    make available in this module. You must specify this parameter for
    each module in |rsyncd.conf|.


At the same time, my /etc/rssh.conf  has:

user=synology:022:100000:  # rsync, with no chroot

So rssh shouldn't permit to use scp or other methods in order to
overwrite rsyncd.conf.


My setup seems safe (am I missing something?).


> Presumably, this is exactly the behavior that Synology relies on, but this
> means that if the client can write to this configuration file, it can just
> include a pre-xfer exec setting in that rsyncd.conf file and run commands
> on the server side.

Not in my setup.


> So, unfortunately we won't be able to fix Synology in a stable update,
> since it was relying on insecure behavior.  I'll continue with an update
> to fix the libssh2 regression.

I don't know how many people is using rssh (I guess not that many), but
if we limit its use more, it will probably die (it will probably die in
either case :-)).

Cheers,

-Román




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