On Monday, 11 August 2014 at 16:29:10 UTC, Nick Sabalausky wrote:
On 8/9/2014 10:57 AM, Dicebot wrote:
actually avoided learning anything out of the default comfort zone and
called that _professional attitude_.


People have some truly bizarre ideas about what constitutes professionalism. At a previous job I had, at one particular developer's meeting with one of the brass (it was a weekly meeting that primarily served to make this particular manager/co-owner feel like she was being useful - not that she ever was - by sticking her fingers where they didn't belong), by pure chance all the developers happened to be wearing shirts with collars. The manager made a big point about how happy she was to see that because (paraphrasing here) "shirt collars are professional".

Yea, forget competence, skill, ability, work ethic, demeanor...no, apparently "professionalism" involves..."shirt collars". Idiot.

That's not the only example of clothing-based naivety I've seen among people who *should* know better: It's truly disturbing how many businesspeople can be trivially fooled into thinking any old random con artist is a trustworthy professional, simply by the con artist walking into any dept store and buying a suit to wear. "Oh, I see he's wearing a suit. That means he must be very professional!"

People are morons.

The sad reality is that your physical appearance - including your clothing - can have a big impact on how people perceive you, so in many situations, wearing nicer clothing can have a definite impact. This is particularly true when dealing with stuff like sales where you're constantly having to deal with new people. That's not to say that clothing makes the man, but impressions like that can matter, even if it seems like they shouldn't. So, it makes a lot of sense for some folks to wear nicer clothes - or "professional" clothes - as part of their job. However, for engineers, it's ridiculous. We shouldn't normally be interacting with anyone where it would matter. So, attire like t-shirt and jeans should be fine. Our clothing should have little impact on our job. And in most cases, if an engineering manager is pushing for that sort of thing, I think that it's a very bad sign.

- Jonathan M Davis
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