On 04/07/2018 10:53 AM, Ali wrote:
> On Saturday, 7 April 2018 at 15:26:56 UTC, Ali Çehreli wrote:
>> On 04/07/2018 02:07 AM, sdvcn wrote:
>>>      string stt = "none";
>>>      true?writeln("AA"):writeln("BB");   ///Out:AA
>>>          true?stt="AA":stt="BB";    <<<<-----///Out:BB
>>>      writeln(stt);
>>
>> It is a bug because the behavior does not match the spec:
>>
>>   https://issues.dlang.org/show_bug.cgi?id=18743
>>
>> Ali
>
> Hi Ali C
>
> I think it also a bug because the ternary seem to be returning the
> second part

Maybe... but the following is not a good test for that because the return value of the assignment operator would always be stt regardless of which expression is evaluated.

>
> try
>
>      string stt = "none";
>      string b = "";
>      true?writeln("AA"):writeln("BB");   ///Out:AA
>      b = (true ? stt="AA":stt="BB");    ///Out:BB
>      writeln(stt);
>      writeln(b); ///Out:BB

I tried something else and noticed that it doesn't actually evaluate the third expression because b is never changed:

import std.stdio;

void main() {
    int a;
    int b;
    int * c = &(true ? a = 1 : b = 2);
    writefln("a:%s %s", a, &a);
    writefln("b:%s %s", b, &b);
    writefln("c:  %s", c);
}

Output:

a:2 7FFDBBF57DB0  <-- Got the value of the third expression (BAD)
b:0 7FFDBBF57DB4  <-- Not changed (good)
c:  7FFDBBF57DB0  <-- Address of a (good)

So, the expression correctly decides to affect and returns 'a' but uses the wrong value to assign.

Ali

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