Hi Heather, good news, and does Cool Beans get into agroforestry research
or use it in its work? Sounds like it must given the references @ your site
to shade trees like citrus and such, and surely there are useful food or
fiber producing shade trees that are also good for insects, here are a
couple features from Mongabay's ongoing series on agroforestry
<https://news.mongabay.com/list/agroforestry/> that is good for wildlife,
people, water tables, etc:

*“Carbon farming” good for the climate, farmers, and biodiversity*

https://news.mongabay.com/2016/07/carbon-farming-can-fight-climate-change-boost-diversity-and-feed-people-author-interview/


*Ethiopia’s vulnerable tropical forests are key to securing future of wild
coffee*

https://news.mongabay.com/2016/10/ethiopias-vulnerable-tropical-forests-are-key-to-securing-future-of-wild-coffee/?n3wsl3tt3r

The author of the book discussed in link 1 could be helpful in terms of
helping you ID shade trees that'd be great for both coffee and bugs, I can
connect you with him, he'd be happy to give you some advice on where to
look.

Erik

--

See my latest writing projects for Sierra magazine, the Guardian,
and others plus online photo gallery here <http://www.erikhoffner.com/>

*tw: @erikhoffner <https://twitter.com/ErikHoffner>*

On Thu, Oct 13, 2016 at 9:33 PM, Heather Kostick <upennbiobl...@gmail.com>
wrote:

> Cool Beans Research is a non-profit research group aimed at putting the
> bird-friendliness back in bird-friendly coffee. Our small but mighty
> team currently consists of Dr. Doug Tallamy (University of Delaware),
> Heather Kostick (Prospective PhD Student at Univ. of Del., and current
> Masters candidate at Penn), and Brad Powell (webmaster extraordinaire).
> We're looking to raise awareness and funds for our research!
>
> 52% of US citizens are coffee drinkers, and 17% of US citizens are
> birders - if you fit into either (or both!) of those categories, then
> this research should interested you! Help Cool Beans Research be at the
> forefront of bird-friendly, shade-grown coffee research.
>
>
> Website: http://coolbeansresearch.org/
>
> Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CoolBeansResearch/
>
>
> Non-profit purpose: To learn which shade tree species used by coffee
> growers throughout Central and South America actually produce the
> insects required to sustain wintering and local birds within coffee
> farms. This information is essential for coffee growers to increase the
> conservation effectiveness of their farms. If all trees produced insects
> in equal abundance and diversity, this would be unnecessary, but there
> are huge differences in how well trees produce the insects birds require
> (Tallamy & Shropshire 2009, Burghardt et al 2010). Non-native trees
> support fewer insects than natives because local insects have not
> adapted to the novel phytochemical defenses of introduced trees. Yet
> even native trees differ widely in their ability to produce insects used
> by birds. Using common-garden experiments and bird foraging surveys on
> cooperator farms in Central and South America, we will evaluate for the
> first time the bird friendliness of regionally favorite shade tree
> species. We have studies currently under way on four farms in Nicaragua
> and Colombia for this purpose.
>
> Thank you for your time!
>

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