>From this side of the Herring Pond, it looks as though a law that requires a 
>plug is sensible for consumer electronics and household appliances (which is 
>the law in Europe), but has been extended, through excess of zeal no doubt, to 
>other sorts of product that can be expected to be installed by qualified 
>technicians.
 
Someone needs to inject common sense.
 
With best wishes DESIGN IT IN! OOO – Own Opinions Only
 <http://www.jmwa.demon.co.uk/> www.jmwa.demon.co.uk J M Woodgate and 
Associates Rayleigh England
 
Sylvae in aeternum manent.
 
From: Kunde, Brian [mailto:brian_ku...@lecotc.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 4:41 PM
To: EMC-PSTC@LISTSERV.IEEE.ORG
Subject: Re: [PSES] Connection to ac mains with split end line cord
 
This is a question that goes back to the beginning of time; or at least the 35 
years I’ve been on the job. And I’ve never heard a good reason for either side 
of the argument. You don’t want unqualified people trying to wire a Plug onto a 
power cord and you don’t want to ship a plug that will most likely be removed 
and thrown away (added cost).  
 
For 115VAC common consumer products in North America drawing less than 12 amps 
and plugging into a common receptacle, yes, I can see that a complete power 
cord with plug would be required as well as convenient to your customer. But 
for higher current devices and/or equipment racks where the User can choose the 
voltage/current range, there can be literally dozens of different AC Mains 
sources that can power these devices; each requiring a different type of plug.
 
We have a similar scenario coming up.  A device that has a universal AC Mains 
input of 100VAC (30 amps) to 240VAC ±10% (15 amps).  In North America alone, it 
can be powered by a 115VAC single phase, 230VAC single phase, 208VAC Line-Line, 
208VAC Line-N (115VAC), 240V split-phase, etc. and in a NEMA blade or NEMA 
twist-lock or IEC 60309 type receptacle. The Current rating is dependent on the 
voltage.  We have no way of knowing what our Customer has as a Mains Supply. So 
the plug used is determined by the AC source and provided receptacle and 
installed by our company’s qualified installers or by a local electrician or 
other qualified person.  If the customer wants to permanently wire the device 
in according to local electrical codes, our captive power cord and strain 
relief can be used or removed and conduit can be used. But this is all decided 
on by our customer; not by the manufacturer.  So, in this scenario, we would 
like to ship the product with a captive power cord and no plug.  
 
But we have been told what has been said here; that a product has to ship with 
a plug. So we ship with a 30 amp twistlock plug (our plug of choice) but we 
know most of the time it will be removed and thrown away or tossed into some 
electrician’s tool box at a cost of $20US or more.  The only one benefitting by 
this rule is the plug manufacturers (IMHO). 
 
If someone has clarification on this or a nice justifiable way NOT to ship 
plugs on a flexible power cord, please let me know.
 
Thanks and regards,
The Other Brian
 
 
From: Boštjan Glavič [mailto:bostjan.gla...@siq.si] 
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 12:29 AM
To: EMC-PSTC@LISTSERV.IEEE.ORG <mailto:EMC-PSTC@LISTSERV.IEEE.ORG> 
Subject: Re: [PSES] Connection to ac mains with split end line cord
 
Hi Ken,
 
With short delay, Thank you.
 
So on short, if flexible cord is used, cord must have a plug, if wiring 
terminals are used, cord must be put in conduits.
 
Do you know the background of this requirement? Is this applicable even if unit 
is used in a computer room with raised floor?
 
Best regards,
Bostjan
 
From: IBM Ken [mailto:ibm...@gmail.com] 
Sent: Monday, September 5, 2016 6:52 PM
To: Boštjan Glavič <bostjan.gla...@siq.si <mailto:bostjan.gla...@siq.si> >
Cc: EMC-PSTC@LISTSERV.IEEE.ORG <mailto:EMC-PSTC@LISTSERV.IEEE.ORG> 
Subject: Re: [PSES] Connection to ac mains with split end line cord
 
Hi Bostjan!
 
NEC (NFPA 70) has an Article 645 which covers "Information technology 
equipment" rooms.  This article states, among other things, that flexible 
linecords must have a 'plug cap'.  
People sometimes mistakenly stop their analysis there, stating either that the 
intended installation location is not an "ITE room" or that the local Authority 
Having Jurisdisction has waived that requirement.
 
However, 60950-1 has D1 deviations and Annex NAE makes specific reference to 
the fact that equipment must comply with the requirements in article 645 of 
NFPA 70.  Therefore, ITE (regardless of what the intended installation location 
is or what the AHJ says) Listed to 60950 must comply by having a plug on the 
end of the flexible line cord (which also must be <14' long after exiting the 
cabinet, by the way).
 
Some will attempt to work around this by declaring the mains branch circuit 
breaker box as another piece of ITE and then declaring the flexible linecord as 
'interconnecting cable' but this is not legitimate either.
 
The only accepted method of providing stripped power leads that meets the 
requirements of 60950-1 and the NEC is to provide the equipment with wiring 
terminals and provision for mounting of conduit.
 
-Ken A
 
On Mon, Sep 5, 2016 at 9:36 AM, Boštjan Glavič <bostjan.gla...@siq.si 
<mailto:bostjan.gla...@siq.si> > wrote:
Dear experts,

Can you help me with below item. I do not have experiences with NEC/CEC. Some 
people told me that only ATMs are allowed to be connected to mains without the 
plug, but i think this is strange requirement.

Customer has an IT equipment cabinet (IEC 60950-1) with built-in power supply 
rack (shelf) with several modular power supplies. Power of such cabinet is 
rated round 200 kVA. The power supply rack is provided with two special (UL 
1977) input connectors. Connection to supply will be realized by split end line 
cord (with plug/connector on unit side and split end on the other side). Split 
end of the cord will be connected to junction box mounted under the floor. 
Junction box will be connected to control panel. Unit will not be directly 
supplied from the panel, but always from the junction box.
Cables and connectors will not be visible / accessible from outside, but only 
after opening of front cover of the end system rack (this action is allowed to 
service personnel only).

Manual circuit breaker will be provided in wall installation.

Is such construction acceptable by NEC and CEC?

Best regards,
Bostjan

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