----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
Anna, Turbulence files have been taken over by ELO.
The hope is to have them available by December.




Stephanie

Stephanie Strickland

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http://stephaniestrickland.com
..  ..  ..  ..
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On Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 5:14 PM, Anna Munster <a.muns...@unsw.edu.au> wrote:

> ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
> Ah I knew there would be lotsa dirty money lurking on this list ;-)
> Thanks RYBN for chiming in - you’d remember I’ve also written about your
> work in both my ‘Data_undermining…’ piece (about to go under due to
> Turbulence.org’s demise ;-( and in An Aesthesia…
>
> I was wondering if you would include Shu Lea Chang’s ‘Garlic=Rich Air' '
> http://garlic02.worldofprojects.info/  on your list? This was an early
> attempt (2002) to create a kind of alt currency via planting, harvesting
> and then trading organic garlic for access to URLs, storage space and so
> on. I think it finished in about 2008 but that’s not a bad lifecycle for
> either an art or trading project!
>
> Something I like about this project is that it so obviously pits different
> timescales against and across networks, trade and agriculture (as well as
> labour of course!). It enacts something that Nick was getting at in his
> post about the problem of relationalities at incompossible (as Tim would
> say) scales….and their (in)capacities to affect each other. .But I think
> that’s also what you were perhaps dealing with in FLASHCRASH SONIFICATION
>
> …ultimately, this problem of the relations of different speeds between
> network movement (and of the compounding logarithmic nature of this rather
> than simply being a question of relative speeds) and living labour is what
> I think net artists dealing with financialisation have most
> affectively/effectively explored…Anna
>
> Anna Munster
> Associate Professor,
> Faculty of Art and Design
> UNSW
> P.O Box 259
> Paddington
> NSW 2021
> Australia
> a.muns...@unsw.edu.au
> http://sensesofperception.info
>
>
> > On 16 Sep 2016, at 12:15 AM, ~rybn <i...@rybn.org> wrote:
> >
> > ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
> > dear Anna,
> >
> > can also ping towards various other projects related to trading,
> financial networks and so on,
> > some already were mentioned
> >
> > the list isn't totally complete, and quite personal. divided in two
> categoris,
> >
> > A. projects that implies a direct interaction with markets, trading,
> manipulating money or architecture of finance, simulations of algorithms or
> active algorithms.
> >
> >     1 CATCHING A FALLING KNIFE (MICHAEL GOLDBERG, 2002)
> >     2 GWEI (UBERMORGEN, CIRIO, LUDOVICO, 2005)
> >     3 OTC (Société Réaliste, 2007)
> >     4 RATTRADERS (MICHAEL MARCOVICI, 2009)
> >     5 ADM8 (RYBN.ORG 2011)
> >     6 COMMUNICATION VÉGÉTALE (HORIA COSMIN SAMOÏLA, 2011)
> >     7 A SUPERSTITIOUS FUND (SHING TAT CHUNG, 2012)
> >     8 ADMX / THE ALGORITHMIC TRADING FREAKSHOW (RYBN.ORG 2013)
> >     9 M&A (GOLDIN+SENNEBY, 2013)
> >     10 ROBIN HOOD ASSET MANAGEMENT COOPERATIVE (AKSELI VIRTANEN &
> COLLECTIVE, 2013)
> >     11 (W)ORLD CURRENCY (PAOLO CIRIO, 2014)
> >     12 EQUITY BOT (SCOTT KILDALL, 2014)
> >     13 VOLATILITY STORMS (FEMKE HERREGRAVEN, 2014)
> >     14 Ami Clarke, Low Animal Spirits (2014)
> >     15 ADMXI (RYBN.ORG, 2015)
> >
> > the latter contains trading algorithms prototypes from : Horia Cosmin
> Samoila, b01, Marc Swynghedaw, Suzanne Treister, Brendan Howell, Nicolas
> Montgermont, Antoine Schmitt
> >
> > B. Other projects, implying only data viz and/or aesthetics
> >
> >         1 Lynn Hershmann, Synthia (2000)
> >         2 Aernout Mik, Middlemen (2001)
> >         3 Joshua Portway & Lise Autogena, BLACK SHOALS STOCK MARKET
> PLANETARIUM (2004)
> >         4 Mathieu Bernard-Reymond, Monuments (2005)
> >         5 Mathieu Saladin, Stock Exchange Piece (2007)
> >         6 Michael Najjar, High Altitude (2008/2009)
> >         7 Samuel Bianchini, ALL OVER (2009)
> >         8 Genevieve Hoffman, Financial Landscapes (2012)
> >         9 Geraldine Juarez, WEALTH TRANSFER (2013)
> >         10 Fabio Lattanzi Antinori, Flashcrash Unlimited (2014)
> >
> > and some online references on the topic
> >
> > ART & ARGENT
> > http://www.multimedialab.be/doc/images/index.php?album=argent
> >
> > ART IN A TIME OF RECESSION
> > http://www.dazeddigital.com/artsandculture/article/17248/
> 1/hacked-burned-economic-recession-art
> >
> > MON3Y AS AN 3RRROR
> > http://www.mon3y.us/
> >
> > /
> >
> > quite interested in the thread for completing our own data on the topic,
> >
> > x
> >
> > rybn
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > Le 15/09/2016 à 08:06, Nicholas Knouf a écrit :
> >> ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
> >>
> >>
> >> Hi Anna and Tim, and others on the list,
> >>
> >> Thanks for mentioning MAICgregator! And thanks again Anna for writing
> about it in your recent book. Indeed, MAICgregator is no longer actively
> updated, not because of some of the issues that Tim and Anna have raised,
> but rather for more mundane ones, namely the difficulties of keeping
> net.art active. MAICgregator functioned by screen-scraping websites (that
> is, using code to "read" and collect data from other institutions'
> websites), and to keep that code current would nearly be a full-time job. I
> kept up with it for a number of years, but once I finished my PhD I
> realized I simply did not have time to do this anymore. There is code deep
> in MAICgregator that was specific to the design and layout of tens of
> different websites, and keeping track of changes in each of those websites
> would itself be nearly a full-time job. There's the additional issue that
> browsers themselves, such as Firefox, are developing at such a rapid pace
> as to make it nearly impossible for a single developer to keep up. Further
> restrictions by browser manufacturers on what extensions (like
> MAICgregator) can do also makes the net.artist's life difficult. So it has
> to do with obsolescence and speed rather than the challenges of working
> with finance-as-topic within the art world.
> >>
> >> But there is a separate challenge for any artist---not just a
> net.artist---in working with financial data, and it is something I touch on
> a bit in my recent book _How Noise Matters to Finance_. There I write about
> the work of the French collective rybn and their FLASHCRASH SONIFICATION,
> which is one of the few pieces that I know of that directly addresses
> contemporary high-frequency trading. Their piece sonifies the activity of a
> number of stock exchanges on May 6, 2010---the date of what is now called
> the "flash crash"---in order to provide an affective account of that day
> where the stock exchanges had tremendous swings both down _and_ up. While
> the blame for these swings cannot be placed squarely on the actions of high
> frequency trading programs, these algorithms did contribute to the
> volatility. Nevertheless, the piece enables one to experience the noisy
> activity of the markets through sound, attuning one to the activity of the
> machinic.
> >>
> >> But their piece is only made possible through the free release of a
> large amount of financial data from a company called Nanex, a firm that has
> been highly critical of the move towards high frequency trading. Access to
> financial data is big business, and without Nanex's release of this data
> rybn's project would not have been possible. Indeed, when I was looking at
> working with stock market data a number of years ago, I discovered that it
> would be financially infeasible. To get access to the amount of data I
> would need would cost me thousands of dollars a month in access fees,
> thousands of dollars a month for computing resources, and likely thousands
> of dollars a month to hire a specialized programmer. Needless to say I did
> not, and do not, have those kinds of resources. Older projects, like the
> famous _Black Shoals Stock Market Planetarium_, required agreements with
> major stock exchanges for access to their data feeds. It's an open question
> as to what sorts of things those exchanges would allow an artist to do with
> their data.
> >>
> >> I speak only for myself, but the challenges in working with financial
> data as an artist are thus not concerns or fear about the subject matter
> itself, but rather more mundane questions of access and resources. And I
> think it's in the more mundane issues that we find the crux of the matter,
> and the difficulty I personally have with making net.art (or computational
> art in general) today, and that is uninteresting complexity. Paradoxically,
> when we now have access to things like arduinos or easy-to-program-in
> environments like Processing, I find it more difficult to make work I find
> interesting, especially if it falls outside of the confines of what these
> environments provide for by default. Building a website that wants to do
> something other than what WordPress or tumblr allows now requires the use
> of HTML frameworks, Javascript, and a large amount of backend code. Keeping
> up with all of the changes in these libraries is itself a full-time job.
> (Something interesting to consider is whether or not the proliferation of
> internet art on platforms like tumblr or Instagram is due in part to the
> uninteresting complexity of building websites from scratch today.)  If I
> step away from my iOS code for a few months I find that most of it won't
> compile anymore, there are new APIs to use, and Apple has changed the
> process for uploading apps to the AppStore, yet again. While it was complex
> to write code a decade, two decades, three decades ago, I feel as if
> surmounting that complexity through a kind of understanding was possible.
> Today the parts are so integrated, so often changing, that it takes a team
> of people working full-time to understand the full stack. Perhaps that
> means the net.artist needs to collaborate more, to hire people who devote
> their entire time to keeping up with these changes. To me these constant
> changes are uninteresting complexity. I'd rather learn and work with other
> things, other complex systems, things that change at a time scale or rhythm
> more suited to my body and my way of knowing and being, instead of a
> temporality dictated by trends, capital, or CPUs. I'm working out what
> those things and systems are, for me personally, over the coming year.
> >>
> >> Best,
> >>
> >> Nick
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> On 9/14/2016 11:43 PM, Anna Munster wrote:
> >>> ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
> >>> Yes MAICgregator is a great example of how the question of finance
> totally subtends all kinds of relations across the net, especially
> pedagogical/knowledge ones! I also think this work was way ahead of the
> game in that it perhaps signalled how an activism might arise around
> ‘outing’ all kinds of knowledge-based institutions’ ‘investments’ in dirty
> monies. Recently this has upscaled to demands that universities and
> colleges divest from dirty financial networks.
> >>>
> >>> If Nick’s around I’d love to hear from him about where he’s going with
> the finance-knowledge-network relationship and why he deactivated
> MAICgregator…is finance too touchy a subject for art?
> >>>
> >>> cheers
> >>> Anna
> >>>
> >>> Anna Munster
> >>> Associate Professor,
> >>> Faculty of Art and Design
> >>> UNSW
> >>> P.O Box 259
> >>> Paddington
> >>> NSW 2021
> >>> Australia
> >>>
> >>> a.muns...@unsw.edu.au
> >>> http://sensesofperception.info
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>> On 15 Sep 2016, at 7:52 AM, Timothy Conway Murray <t...@cornell.edu>
> >>>>  wrote:
> >>>>
> >>>> ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
> >>>> Thanks so much for joining us, Anna, and for focusing our attention
> on net.art focusing on the finances of the web.  While not directly in with
> Heath Bunting's piece, which I'm very pleased to see recalled, you have me
> thinking fondly of Nick Knouf's MAICgregator (
> >>>> http://maicgregator.org
> >>>> ) that is a Firefox extension that aggregated information about the
> embeddedness of colleges and universities (I seem to recall that he focused
> on US institutions) in the military-academic-industrial contex. The
> software provided an overlay on university homepages of the data culled
> from government funding databases and news sources, etc., as well as
> information about university trustees.
> >>>>
> >>>> I recall Nick's being aggressed quite harshly by one of my colleagues
> for the "terrorism" of his project (whose aim was to reveal the disguistes
> of terrorism of a different sort).  I'm hoping that Nick will see this post
> and perhaps comment in more detail on this fascinating and innovative piece
> (which seems to be no longer active).   I seem to recall that Anna might
> have written something about this piece in her last book as well?
> >>>>
> >>>> Cheers,
> >>>>
> >>>> Tim
> >>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> Timothy Murray
> >>>> Professor of Comparative Literature and English
> >>>> Taylor Family Director, Society for the Humanities
> >>>>
> >>>> http://www.arts.cornell.edu/sochum/
> >>>>
> >>>> Curator, Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art
> >>>>
> >>>> http://goldsen.library.cornell.edu
> >>>>
> >>>> A D White House
> >>>> Cornell University,
> >>>> Ithaca, New York 14853
> >>>>
> >>>> _______________________________________________
> >>>> empyre forum
> >>>>
> >>>> empyre@lists.artdesign.unsw.edu.au
> >>>> http://empyre.library.cornell.edu
> >>> _______________________________________________
> >>> empyre forum
> >>>
> >>> empyre@lists.artdesign.unsw.edu.au
> >>> http://empyre.library.cornell.edu
> >>
> >> --
> >> Nicholas Knouf
> >> Assistant Professor, Cinema and Media Studies Program
> >> Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481
> >> Office: Clapp 306 (2016–2017 academic year)   Office Phone:
> 781.283.2105   Fax: 781.283.3647
> >> PGP: 0xAB50A0D9
> >> How Noise Matters to Finance available now!
> >>
> >>
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> empyre forum
> >>
> >> empyre@lists.artdesign.unsw.edu.au
> >> http://empyre.library.cornell.edu
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > empyre forum
> > empyre@lists.artdesign.unsw.edu.au
> > http://empyre.library.cornell.edu
>
> _______________________________________________
> empyre forum
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