----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
Water sonification is so fascinating and I wish I knew more! But
algorithms, sat images, software are not neutral. Like words, they make
some things sensible and not others. They order our imaginations and so I
think it is worth fighting for which words we use.

That said, if interesting, we wrote an article about methods used to study
weediness: http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.2993/0278-0771-38.1.039

E

On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 4:30 PM, Irina Contreras <icontre...@cca.edu> wrote:

> ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
> I really appreciate this dialogue and this particular response Elaine.
>
> It's difficult to read about invasive species and not think of the way
> this language is used in regards to humans/children/borders/land as it very
> directly affects migration etc.
>
> Additionally, I am from Los Angeles where nearly everything that grows is
> thought of as being "invasive". For better or for worse, the palm tree is
> such a symbol of LA (I always think of the burning ones during the LA
> uprising) and has (supposedly?) dramatically increased the rat population.
> I have no idea if these are tall tales...in a way they are even interesting
> to me in retrospect as tall tales given the space that some of you occupy
> in actually studying these rebellious spores and creatures.
>
> Thanks again.
>
> On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 12:06 PM, Elaine Gan <ega...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
>> for Aviva,
>>
>> How to listen: some wise feminists are calling for extended field
>> observations, or collaborative practice (combine artists, social-natural
>> scientists), or historical research. basically, trying to get to know an
>> organism on its terms.
>>
>> non/native conflicts: I think these binaries are colonial, violent in
>> themselves. Species are relational. A plant becomes invasive bec of certain
>> conditions (usually monoculture or chemical overdose, i.e. industry). and
>> how exactly do we delineate introduced or endemic? species (including
>> plants) move around a very great deal. I don’t think it is the work of art
>> to categorize and resolve these conflicts. I think the hard work is opening
>> spaces where these novel interactions can be studied beyond colonial
>> rhetoric.
>>
>> E
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 12:18 PM Aviva Rahmani <ghostn...@ghostnets.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>>> ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
>>> How would you propose we listen, Elaine? How would we distinguish
>>> conflicts, for example between introduced and endemic species?
>>>
>>> Aviva Rahmani, PhD
>>> www.ghostn...@ghostnets.com <http://www.ghostn...@ghostnets.com>
>>> Watch ³Blued Trees²:  https://vimeo.com/135290635
>>> www.gulftogulf.org <http://www.gulftogulf.org/>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On 6/13/18, 12:11 PM, "empyre-boun...@lists.artdesign.unsw.edu.au on
>>> behalf of Elaine Gan" <empyre-boun...@lists.artdesign.unsw.edu.au on
>>> behalf of ega...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>     ----------empyre- soft-skinned space----------------------
>>>
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> empyre forum
>>> empyre@lists.artdesign.unsw.edu.au
>>> http://empyre.library.cornell.edu
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> empyre forum
>> empyre@lists.artdesign.unsw.edu.au
>> http://empyre.library.cornell.edu
>>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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