EV Digest 2405

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) Re: EMeter and Palm device
        by Rod Hower <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
  2) Re: AC control power module
        by Rod Hower <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
  3) Re: EMeter and Palm device
        by Seth Murray <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
  4) Re: advanced IGBTs
        by Rod Hower <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
  5) Re: AC control power module
        by Seth <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
  6) GE shunt motor
        by Seth <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
  7) Re: AC control power module
        by Rod Hower <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
  8) Re: AC control power module
        by Victor Tikhonov <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
  9) Re: EMeter and Palm device
        by Seth <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 10) RE: EMeter and Palm device
        by "Walker, Lesley R" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 11) Re: EMeter and Palm device
        by Jim Coate <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 12) Re: Newbie question re: Rabbit conversions an Stuff
        by Jim Coate <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 13) range vs weight
        by Jim Coate <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 14) Re: Sacramento Racing, pics and story.
        by John Bryan <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 15) OT- Pocket PC Dev  was(Re: An embarassing admission & Q about CE)
        by "damon henry" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 16) EVLN(Bridgestone's li-ion additive doubles battery capacity)
        by Bruce EVangel Parmenter <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 17) EVLN(Ford had no comment on Zap's bid to buy Think)
        by Bruce EVangel Parmenter <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 18) EVLN(Mitsubishi testing of an experimental EV prototype)
        by Bruce EVangel Parmenter <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 19) EVLN(Zap's Starr to make Think EVs a more cost effective)
        by Bruce EVangel Parmenter <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 20) EVLN(GEM Comes to the Empire State)
        by Bruce EVangel Parmenter <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 21) EVLN(UDEL Polysulfone Avoids Industrial Battery Breakdown)
        by Bruce EVangel Parmenter <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 22) EVLN(DoE report praises hybrids)
        by Bruce EVangel Parmenter <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
 23) Re: Newbie question re: Rabbit conversions
        by "Chuck Hursch" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
--- Begin Message ---
I'm going to buy a Palm or similar device
for logging data from the Emeter.
Cost is a factor but not the top one.
I want to make sure there is enough memory to record everything.
If the consensus is the Palm 105 is enough I'll buy it and be happy.
What is the recommendation of the list?
Thanks,
Rod

Joe Smalley wrote:
The emeter puts out data every second.
There is no way to turn it off.
Check it with an LED across pins 3 and 5 on the DB-9 on the back of the
meter.

Check the cable to the cradle the same way.
Make sure the data is coming in the RX data pin on the display device.

Joe Smalley
Rural Kitsap County WA
Fiesta 48 volts
NEDRA 48 volt street conversion record holder
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

----- Original Message -----
From: "John G. Lussmyer" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>; <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Sent: Sunday, November 03, 2002 7:59 PM
Subject: EMeter and Palm device



So I have an EMeter with RS-232 output.
I have a Handspring Visor Pro, with an RS-232 cradle.
I have the EVDash software loaded on the Visor.
Connect everything together, and .... nothing.
Now, how do I get it to actually receive data from the EMeter?
Is there an EMeter setting that needs to be set?
Will EVDash work with a Handspring Visor?

Or am I just having a really bad day?

--
John G. Lussmyer      mailto:Cougar@;CasaDelGato.Com
Dragons soar and Tigers prowl while I dream.... http://www.CasaDelGato.com



--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message --- Victor,
I design motor controls, gate drive is not a problem for
me. Mechanical interface is a bigger problem however.
I can wind AC motors at work and have plenty of gate
drives that will work with this module.
The important thing for me would be a mechanical
interface to the existing transaxle.
Current golf cart motors do not have an endplate, they use
the transaxle instead. I would like a conversion plate to hook
up a standard C face AC induction motor to the golf cart transaxle.
Any ideas? (inexpensive that is :-)
The next step is convincing a supplier it will be used for existing work
projects and get a free sample. (not trying to mislead them, but I think the price is a little steep for my work drives.
Rod

Victor Tikhonov wrote:
You'd want one with integrated gate drivers.

Victor

Rod Hower wrote:

http://www.ixys.com/l520.pdf

This would be a nice module for an AC power golfcart.
350A, 75V 3-phase Trench MOSFET.


--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message --- I just bought a Palm III for 35 bux on Ebay for this very purpose, been wanting to do it ever since I first saw the EV Dash program. We'll see how it works. I'm going to find myself a USB to serial adaptor too, so I can download data onto my TiBook and perform numerous meaningless calculations and graphs :-)

Seth


On Monday, November 4, 2002, at 10:38 PM, Rod Hower wrote:

I'm going to buy a Palm or similar device
for logging data from the Emeter.
Cost is a factor but not the top one.
I want to make sure there is enough memory to record everything.
If the consensus is the Palm 105 is enough I'll buy it and be happy.
What is the recommendation of the list?
Thanks,
Rod

Joe Smalley wrote:
The emeter puts out data every second.
There is no way to turn it off.
Check it with an LED across pins 3 and 5 on the DB-9 on the back of the
meter.
Check the cable to the cradle the same way.
Make sure the data is coming in the RX data pin on the display device.
Joe Smalley
Rural Kitsap County WA
Fiesta 48 volts
NEDRA 48 volt street conversion record holder
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
----- Original Message -----
From: "John G. Lussmyer" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>; <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Sent: Sunday, November 03, 2002 7:59 PM
Subject: EMeter and Palm device
So I have an EMeter with RS-232 output.
I have a Handspring Visor Pro, with an RS-232 cradle.
I have the EVDash software loaded on the Visor.
Connect everything together, and .... nothing.
Now, how do I get it to actually receive data from the EMeter?
Is there an EMeter setting that needs to be set?
Will EVDash work with a Handspring Visor?

Or am I just having a really bad day?

--
John G. Lussmyer mailto:Cougar@;CasaDelGato.Com
Dragons soar and Tigers prowl while I dream.... http://www.CasaDelGato.com






--
QUESTION INTERNAL COMBUSTION

http://users.wpi.edu/~sethm/
http://www.austinev.org/evalbum/387.html
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message --- If they meant 'Seconds' Otmar could be turning 10's in the quarter :-)
Switching losses would be kind of high, but short circuit rating of 10 Seconds would be nice :-)
FYI. for the newbie control designer, IGBT's and MOSFETs typically
have a SC rating of 10uS or 10S/1000000.
Rod

Victor Tikhonov wrote:
Suhas Malghan wrote:

Can't say I understand everything in this press release but it sounds
promising...
...
For

example, new devices are capable of 0.3s turn-off time compared to 1.6s for
previous generation devices.

They probably meant uS, not seconds (!)

Victor


--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
2.3 milliohms is pretty nice too. But the datasheet is a bit light. I am
used to seeing maximum safe operating area, diode curves and such, makes
me think it is still a beta rev part. The mechanical CADD solid model
screenshots aren't too encouraging, either.

Would you go 36 or 48VAC?

Seth

Rod Hower wrote:
> 
> Victor,
> I design motor controls, gate drive is not a problem for
> me.  Mechanical interface is a bigger problem however.
> I can wind AC motors at work and have plenty of gate
> drives that will work with this module.
> The important thing for me would be a mechanical
> interface to the existing transaxle.
> Current golf cart motors do not have an endplate, they use
> the transaxle instead.  I would like a conversion plate to hook
> up a standard C face AC induction motor to the golf cart transaxle.
> Any ideas? (inexpensive that is :-)
> The next step is convincing a supplier it will be used for existing work
> projects and get a free sample.  (not trying to mislead them, but I
> think the price is a little steep for my work drives.
> Rod
> 
> Victor Tikhonov wrote:
> > You'd want one with integrated gate drivers.
> >
> > Victor
> >
> > Rod Hower wrote:
> >
> >>http://www.ixys.com/l520.pdf
> >>
> >>This would be a nice module for an AC power golfcart.
> >>350A, 75V 3-phase Trench MOSFET.
> >
> >
> >

-- 
vze3v25q@verizondotnet
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
Got my eBay GE/Yamaha shunt motor today. 48V, 2.7kW peak. 3650 rpm.
Class H insulation. Looks like 4 pole, 40 turns of 0.8mm wire (18 AWG?)
per pole and some flattened tuns for the armature. I will measure field
resistance tomorrow. Finding a nice large MOSFET with low RDSon (under
10 milliohm) that is good for 80V or more is next. A single device good
for 200A is nice, but I might have to parallel.

Seth
-- 
vze3v25q@verizondotnet
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message --- I would go for 48Vdc input. I think this part is designed
for the forklift/42V auto market. Forklifts are typically
24-48Vdc. Golf carts are to cheap to buy a module for this amount
(unless it is a turbo-charged high end vehicle for the wealthy).
This voltage is too low for the NEV crowd, although I'm sure they'll
be announcing a 100V or 150V module for this group (except much cheaper!). I would really like a 100V module for a NEV control though.
Bottom line is that you can lay out your own with TO-247 devices at a cost that is 1/4 of their published module prices.
Rod

Seth wrote:
2.3 milliohms is pretty nice too. But the datasheet is a bit light. I am
used to seeing maximum safe operating area, diode curves and such, makes
me think it is still a beta rev part. The mechanical CADD solid model
screenshots aren't too encouraging, either.

Would you go 36 or 48VAC?

Seth

Rod Hower wrote:

Victor,
I design motor controls, gate drive is not a problem for
me.  Mechanical interface is a bigger problem however.
I can wind AC motors at work and have plenty of gate
drives that will work with this module.
The important thing for me would be a mechanical
interface to the existing transaxle.
Current golf cart motors do not have an endplate, they use
the transaxle instead.  I would like a conversion plate to hook
up a standard C face AC induction motor to the golf cart transaxle.
Any ideas? (inexpensive that is :-)
The next step is convincing a supplier it will be used for existing work
projects and get a free sample.  (not trying to mislead them, but I
think the price is a little steep for my work drives.
Rod

Victor Tikhonov wrote:

You'd want one with integrated gate drivers.

Victor

Rod Hower wrote:


http://www.ixys.com/l520.pdf

This would be a nice module for an AC power golfcart.
350A, 75V 3-phase Trench MOSFET.



--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
Rod Hower wrote:
> 
> Victor,
> I design motor controls, gate drive is not a problem for
> me.  Mechanical interface is a bigger problem however.

Yes, I was just saying that IGBT modules with integrated gate drives
do exist, which is convenient from the part count, reliability and
already
matching parameters stand points. I'm sure you don't have problems 
with gate drive designs either way.

Mechanical stuff is whole different game :-)

Victor
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
Be careful with a USB to RS-232 adapter. They often don't work, or at
least I have seen them not work several times.

Seth

Seth Murray wrote:
> 
> I just bought a Palm III for 35 bux on Ebay for this very purpose, been
> wanting to do it ever since I first saw the EV Dash program.  We'll see
> how it works.  I'm going to find myself a USB to serial adaptor too, so
> I can download data onto my TiBook and perform numerous meaningless
> calculations and graphs  :-)
> 
>         Seth
> 
-- 
vze3v25q@verizondotnet
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
Rod Hower asked:
> I'm going to buy a Palm or similar device
> for logging data from the Emeter.
> Cost is a factor but not the top one.
> I want to make sure there is enough memory to record everything.
> If the consensus is the Palm 105 is enough I'll buy it and be happy.
> What is the recommendation of the list?

I have a Palm Vx, which has 8Mb of memory (same amount as the 105).
It contains, among many other things, the entire Collins English-Italian
dictionary.  How much data do you want to log?  :-)

I think the question is really what logging application you would use,
and is there a limit on how much data that application can store.

The only EV specific application I know of is EV Dash (there has been a
URL posted, I'm sorry I don't know what it is but I'm sure you know how
to search the archives).  I haven't loaded it into my Palm so I don't
know what it does.

There may be other non-specific logging applications around.  Places to
look include http://www.palmgear.com and http://groups.google.com (look
in comp.sys.palmtops.pilot and related newsgroups).  You might even be
able to use a simple terminal emulation app, if there is one that does
text capture.

One other thing to bear in mind, if you want to do any useful analysis
of the data you capture, you will probably need to extract it from the
Palm and dump it into a spreadsheet or a database.  Typically, Palm
application data is backed up onto a PC when you synchronise it, but the
copy on the PC is in Palm format.

I'll be interested to hear how you go with this, as I'm also thinking
of doing this sort of thing when I get my EV built.

-- 
Lesley Walker
Unix Engineering, EDS New Zealand
[EMAIL PROTECTED]
"[Hybrid electric vehicles] are self-sustaining,
as long as you keep putting gas in the tank."
     --- James R. Healey, USA Today
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
"Walker, Lesley R" wrote:
> One other thing to bear in mind, if you want to do any useful analysis
> of the data you capture, you will probably need to extract it from the
> Palm and dump it into a spreadsheet or a database.  Typically, Palm
> application data is backed up onto a PC when you synchronise it, but the
> copy on the PC is in Palm format.

I don't use a Palm, but... ideally you'd want some way to tell the Palm
how often to record the data coming from the meter. If you are recording
what happens driving around town for 10 minutes getting data every
second is probably useful. But if you are recording the charge cycle
overnight, more like every minute is plenty of data. Even if the Palm
has enough memory to store it all, the spreadsheet may choke on 40,000+
data points.

I've used a basic terminal emulation program on a laptop to capture all
the data, and then run it through a simple basic program to pull out
data at more reasonable time intervals, then imported it to a spread
sheet to make pretty graphs (and looking at one of those graphs, Joe or
someone on the list diagnosed what went wrong with my charger at the
time :-). I think Lee or someone else has mad a more extensive PC
program to process the data?


_________
Jim Coate
1992 Chevy S-10
1970s Elec-Trak E20
http://www.eeevee.com
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
Bob Rice wrote:
> 4 years as an electric, with over 55 thousand miles on it, and
> 3 sets of cells so far. <snip> 20 in all [...] T-145@ 72 lbs

Wow... somehow I feel a little better. That makes something like 1.5
years per pack when driving 13,000 miles per year. I've now worn out 2
packs at about 1.25 years per pack and 8,000 miles per year. I have been
using the 8 volters (which many told me ahead of time would have much
shorter life) and with 22 batteries in the truck, I have essentially the
same size pack in a vehicle that weighs 1000 pounds more. So I don't
have as much range and don't rack up as many miles per year but do cycle
it daily. Interesting to compare.


_________
Jim Coate
1992 Chevy S-10
1970s Elec-Trak E20
http://www.eeevee.com
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
Is there any way to estimate (or guess) how much difference removing 600
pounds from my truck would make in terms of range? I'd assume it would
be more pronounced in stop & go driving around town, which is most of
what I do, but will it be enough to really notice? The truck is now at
4300 pounds, so at 3700 pounds it would be 14% lighter.

This would be the result if I switched to Evercels.  Using a 22 PBA
8-volt set up is good for about 18 KWhrs max (at EV levels), changing to
22 6-volt PBAs should get me closer to 20 KWhrs (that extra few pounds
in each battery), and  a set of 26 Evercels that would easily fit in the
existing boxes would be good for about 19 KWhrs. Given the accuracy of
such calculations, I consider these numbers about equal.

So on a warm day, driving a consistent 50 mph on a flat track, all would
theoretically have about the same range to 100% DOD. But the real
question is what happens in real life with stop & go driving (still on a
warm day) - does the weight make that much difference in range?

And BTW, US Battery *does* list the one-hour capacities of their
batteries right on their web site.


_________
Jim Coate
1992 Chevy S-10
1970s Elec-Trak E20
http://www.eeevee.com
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
Otmar wrote:

> We're back from "Silent Thunder" in Sacramento, I've posted some
> pictures at http://www.cafeelectric.com/2k2sacdrags/

        Thanks for posting the great pics! And congratulations on
the new record!! I especially enjoyed seeing the shots of Rane,
what a tease. Her orange hair is a purrfect match to your car.

> The crew from Tech-TV was interviewing everyone in sight

        I'm anxious to hear more about that.

> As I launched my Fluke meter which was recording peak motor amps 
> went flying back from the center console......without that little 
> accident I'm sure I would not have broken my previous record.

        I suppose you could say that your record was just a fluke.

        It's cool that you let Rane take the car down the track. 

> she managed to pull a respectable 15.836 at 94 MPH (she's lighter than I)

        She's lighter than you and more caliphageous too.  :^)

Seeya,
John
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message --- Huh,
It's been a while now, but when I first got my pocket pc I ordered Microsoft embedded Visual Tools 3.0 off of pocketpc.com for free. They sent me the CD's in the mail. Didn't even make me pay the postage. It comes with a full IDE as well as an emualtion progam that runs on any NT class machine. It has both VB and C and maybe some other languages. I don't know if they will still mail you a CD for free, but it looks like you can download it from them if you have the bandwidth.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/dnppc2k2/html/PocketPC2002DownloadsNodeAnchorPage.asp

damon

  The bottom line is that the CE machine lacks a scripting or reasonable
  programming language or I would have written the program. Visual Basic
  plus the CE compiler costs ~US$ 650.00.  The computer could easily
_________________________________________________________________
Broadband? Dial-up? Get reliable MSN Internet Access. http://resourcecenter.msn.com/access/plans/default.asp
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
EVLN(Bridgestone's li-ion additive doubles battery capacity)
[The Internet Electric Vehicle List News. For Public EV
 informational purposes. Contact publication for reprint rights.]
 --- {EVangel}
http://asia.cnn.com/2002/BUSINESS/asia/11/04/japan.bridgestone/index.html
Bridgestone soars on battery prospect
Tuesday, November 5, 2002 Posted: 11:20 AM HKT (0320 GMT)

TOKYO, Japan -- Bridgestone Corp. has developed a way of
doubling how long an electric car's battery can run,
according to a report.

Bridgestone's invention is an additive that goes in a
battery's electrolyte solution, making lithium-ion batteries
noncombustible, according to the Nihon Keizai Shimbun.

Lithium-ion batteries can hold twice as much electricity as
a conventional nickel- hydrogen battery. But they catch fire
at high temperatures because they are made of phosphorus and
nitrogen.

That means they have been restricted to smaller
applications, such as in mobile phones. But Bridgestone's
additive will let carmakers use the batteries in electric
cars.

A 400 kilometer ride
The new battery would double the distance a car could run on
a single charge, to around 400 kilometers (250 miles). The
company said there is no loss of the battery's power storage
using the additive.

According to the Nikkei, the additive would also make it
around 20 percent cheaper to make lithium-ion batteries for
mobile phones and personal computers. Those devices
currently require a device to stop the batteries
combusting.

The Tokyo-based tire maker plans to start selling the
battery in test markets in 2003. It projects that half of
the battery makers in Japan would begin using the additive.

That would boost the lithium-ion battery market from around
300 billion yen ($2.5 billion) in 2000 to 1.6 trillion yen
($13.1 billion) by 2010.
-



=====
' ____
~/__|o\__
'@----- @'---(=
. http://geocities.com/brucedp/
. EV List Editor & RE newswires
. (originator of the EV ascci art above)
=====

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
HotJobs - Search new jobs daily now
http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
EVLN(Ford had no comment on Zap's bid to buy Think)
[The Internet Electric Vehicle List News. For Public EV
 informational purposes. Contact publication for reprint rights.]
 --- {EVangel}
http://www.aftenposten.no/english/business/article.jhtml?articleID=428266
Scooter-maker joins bidding for Think

A California firm that produces electric bikes and scooters
says it has made a USD 10 million bid to take over the
Norwegian electric car producer Think. Ford Motor Co, which
bought Think in 1999, is evaluating offers from several
interested parties.

The California firm, called Zap, told news agency Reuters
that it sees potential for the electric cars in the gated
residential communities that have become popular in the US,
in resort areas and as second cars. Enthusiastic Think
drivers also rave about their efficiency in congested cities
like San Francisco.

"There is demand for electric vehicles, but it doesn't seem
that the conventional automakers are making them available
for sale," Starr told Reuters. "That is Zap's mission."

Ford said it was pulling the plug on its Think venture
mainly because of poor sales. That claim has been rebutted
by Think fans who have told Aftenposten that demand for the
cars is in fact high.

They claim the few Ford dealerships handling the cars in
California have long waiting lists of prospective customers
eager to get their hands on a Think vehicle. They contend
Ford never has conducted any serious marketing or promotion
of the vehicles and report that it's been impossible to buy
Think cars, which have only been available for lease.

That's apparently what's piqued Zap's interest. "What we
have found is that the people who have rented or leased the
cars are very interested in purchasing those cars," Starr
said. "In fact, the people who have leased the Ford cars
have told us they all want to buy the cars."

Zap now produces electric bikes and scooters. Starr said its
"only business" is "the electric vehicle transportation
business," noting that Think would be a good fit.

Zap's offer has been made through its Voltage Vehicles unit,
which is offering up to USD 10 million in cash, stock and
warrants.

Ford paid USD 23 million in 1999 for the Norwegian electric
vehicle firm then known as Pivco. Ford later invested around
USD 100 million more in the venture.

Its Think board has been holding talks with prospective 
investors for the past several weeks. It intended to 
announce a decision on the fate of the venture this week 
but said Tuesday that it needed more time to evaluate 
offers.

Ford had no comment on Zap's bid.
Aftenposten English Web Desk
Nina Berglund  [EMAIL PROTECTED]
-



=====
' ____
~/__|o\__
'@----- @'---(=
. http://geocities.com/brucedp/
. EV List Editor & RE newswires
. (originator of the EV ascci art above)
=====

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
HotJobs - Search new jobs daily now
http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
EVLN(Mitsubishi testing of an experimental EV prototype)
[The Internet Electric Vehicle List News. For Public EV
 informational purposes. Contact publication for reprint rights.]
 --- {EVangel}
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/newse/20021105wo11.htm
Mitsubishi Motors Corp. has uploaded its 2002 Environmental
Sustainability Report to its Web site at
www.mitsubishi-motors.co.jp/ECO-E. Archives dating back to
the report's first publication in 1999 also are available
online. This year's report, which follows environmental
reporting guidelines set out by the Environment Ministry,
cites the development of Mitsubishi Motors' five-year
environmental sustainability plan, zero landfill waste
practices at all production facilities in Japan, road
testing of an experimental electric vehicle prototype, and
Design for Environment principles. According to the company,
the report contains sufficient data to satisfy the needs of
researchers and experts in the environmental field and is
presented in a reader-friendly format, making it equally
accessible to general consumers. Mitsubishi Motors' fiscal
2001 achievements are explained in detail, backed up by
quantitative data, graphs, illustrations and photos. Two new
additions to the report include economic highlights and
reports on community involvement.
-



=====
' ____
~/__|o\__
'@----- @'---(=
. http://geocities.com/brucedp/
. EV List Editor & RE newswires
. (originator of the EV ascci art above)
=====

__________________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
HotJobs - Search new jobs daily now
http://hotjobs.yahoo.com/
--- End Message ---
--- Begin Message ---
EVLN(Zap's Starr to make Think EVs a more cost effective)
[The Internet Electric Vehicle List News. For Public EV
 informational purposes. Contact publication for reprint rights.]
 --- {EVangel}
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-zap1nov01,0,353956.story?coll=la%2Dheadlines%2Dbusiness
November 1, 2002  CALIFORNIA
Electric Scooter Maker Zap Bids on Ford Unit
By John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer

Zap, a small Bay Area manufacturer of electric bicycles and
scooters that only recently emerged from bankruptcy
reorganization, said Thursday that it has offered Ford Motor
Co. $10 million in cash, stock and warrants for its La
Jolla-based Think electric vehicle division.

Ford paid $23 million for Think three years ago and has
invested more than $100 million in the company, but pulled
the plug on the unit earlier this summer, citing poor
demand.

Think, originally part of Norway's Pivco Industries, makes
electric bicycles, golf-cart style neighborhood vehicles and
the plastic-bodied two-seat Think City, which is certified
as a highway-legal passenger car capable of a top speed of
60 mph and a maximum range, at much-reduced speeds, of 60
miles between charges.

Though Ford and General Motors Corp. have abandoned the
battery-powered electric car market, DaimlerChrysler
continues to operate a subsidiary, GEM, that sells
battery-powered neighborhood electric vehicles that are
legal on city streets posted for 35 mph or less.

Zap has never been in the car business, but Chairman Gary
Starr said Thursday that the 8-year-old company's "sole
business is electric vehicles, and we can focus on them
while they were just a sideline for the major auto
companies."

Though Ford and GM have leased electric vehicles to a small
number of consumers, they have not offered them for sale.

"People who rented the Think City tell us they want to buy
it, and people who rented the EV-1 from GM wanted to buy
it," Starr said. "We think there is a market for these
cars."

Starr said Zap, with 30 employees and $5 million in sales
last year, is working on "a technology that can make the
Think cars a lot more cost effective." He declined to
comment further, citing a confidentiality agreement with
Ford.

Ford environmental affairs spokeswoman Carolyn Brown said
she could not comment on Zap or its offer. But Ford said in
August that it would try to sell Think, or work with the
Norwegian government -- where the Think City is built -- to
keep the company viable. Think has two facilities outside
Oslo and employs about 150 people. It has fewer than 100
employees at its headquarters in La Jolla.
-



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EVLN(GEM Comes to the Empire State)
[The Internet Electric Vehicle List News. For Public EV
 informational purposes. Contact publication for reprint rights.]
 --- {EVangel}
New Electric Vehicle Launched in NY; GEM Comes to the 
Empire State

NEW YORK, Oct. 30 /PRNewswire/ -- New Yorkers have a new,
clean and efficient way to get around their neighborhoods
and the state with the introduction of Global Electric
Motorcars, LLC Neighborhood Electric Vehicles (NEVs).

The two- and four-passenger GEMs can be registered in New
York State for operation on private property and public
roads with speed limits up to 35 miles per hour.  The
five-horsepower GEMs, a federally approved low-speed vehicle
(LSV), have a top speed, on road, of 25 miles per hour.

According to GEM President Ken Montler, GEMs are ideal
alternatives to a full-size automobile for short trips, as
well on corporate, academic and military campuses,
especially ones with both public and private roads between
buildings.

"The GEM was designed to operate in cities like Albany,
Syracuse and Buffalo, as well as on college campuses and in
state parks and recreation areas," said Montler.  "They
offer a great alternative to gasoline-powered vehicles, with
lower maintenance costs, greater efficiency, no emissions
and the ability to operate on tight, campus "roads," winding
park turf paths and even inside buildings (where
gasoline-powered vehicles cannot travel)."

Smaller than a "normal" automobile, yet meeting safety
requirements set by both the National Highway Safety
Administration and New York with equipment like three-point
seat belts, safety-glass windshield, wipers, headlights,
turn signals, and mirrors, GEMs can maneuver into places
cars cannot, yet still carry up to four people and their
cargo.

Recharging a GEM can be done at any standard 110-Volt
outlet, which means the 35-mile (approximate) range can be
extended simply by plugging into an outlet each time the
vehicle reaches a destination. "And GEM users generally
travel less than 10 miles a day, so recharging is not an
issue," said Montler.

New York becomes the 38th state to legalize on-road use of
the GEMs, which began production four years ago in Fargo,
ND.  DaimlerChrysler, in December 2000, purchased Global
Electric Motorcars, the largest United States producer of
street-legal electric vehicles.

GEMs sold in New York come with unique standard equipment
including an integrated heater/defroster, rear license-plate
light, reverse light, side-markers, center-high-mounted stop
light, day/night rearview mirror and front-seat three-point
seat belts.

Further information is available at htpp://www.gemcar.com . 
SOURCE  Global Electric Motorcars, LLC CO:  Global Electric
Motorcars, LLC ST:  New York SU:  PDT
http://www.prnewswire.com 10/30/2002 11:30 EST
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EVLN(UDEL Polysulfone Avoids Industrial Battery Breakdown)
[The Internet Electric Vehicle List News. For Public EV
 informational purposes. Contact publication for reprint rights.]
 --- {EVangel}
Solvay Advanced Polymers' UDEL(R) Polysulfone Helps Avoid
Industrial Battery Breakdown

ALPHARETTA, Ga., Oct. 28 /PRNewswire/ -- A high-performance
polymer from Solvay Advanced Polymers, L.L.C. is a key
ingredient in Saft's SRM F3 series battery cells that are
typically used for electrical backup systems in rail
transport systems.

The industrial-strength nickel-cadmium batteries offer
reliable emergency power for onboard lighting, air
conditioning, computing systems, and door control
functions.

UDEL P-1700 from Solvay Advanced Polymers is one of the
materials Saft uses to manufacture the containers (called
cell "jars") that hold the battery cell components.  These
cells are then configured into groups, or trays, to comprise
the completed battery.

Ted Mavronicolas, railway applications engineering manager
of Saft's Industrial Battery Group, in Cockeysville, Md.,
said that UDEL polysulfone has the kind of properties that
translate into longer life, durability, and stability for
Saft's SRM F3 series batteries.

"These cells are filled with potassium hydroxide electrolyte
fluid and are expected to function without water
replenishment for up to two years.  UDEL P- 1700's
resistance to moisture absorption, shock and vibration are
key to maintaining long-term battery stability," said
Mavronicolas.  "And because it's a transparent material, we
can see inside the cell jar to determine water levels
without having to open the vent cap," he added.

UDEL P-1700 excels in many fluid-handling applications. 
This durable, rigid, high-strength thermoplastic has a heat
deflection temperature of 345*F (174*C), and maintains its
properties over a wide temperature range.

Transparent, opaque, and glass-fiber reinforced grades of
UDEL polysulfone can be used for injection molding into
complex parts or extrusion into forms such as rod, film,
sheet, profile, and tubing.  Shapes can be machined for
prototype evaluations; film and sheet can be thermoformed on
conventional equipment.  UDEL polysulfone resin can also be
blow-molded.

About Solvay Advanced Polymers
Solvay Advanced Polymers, L.L.C., is an indirect subsidiary
of Solvay America, Inc., the U.S. holding company of Solvay
S.A.  The company produces high-performance polymers that
are used in a wide range of demanding applications in the
automotive, aerospace, industrial, food service, medical and
electronics industries worldwide.  Solvay Advanced Polymers
products include IXEF(R) polyarylamide and PRIMEF(R)
polyphenylene sulfide product lines of Solvay S.A. combined
with a portfolio of materials that had comprised BP Amoco's
engineering resins business.  For more information about
this and other Solvay Advanced Polymers products and
services, please visit our website at
www.solvayadvancedpolymers.com .

Solvay S.A. is an international pharmaceuticals and
chemicals group with headquarters in Brussels, Belgium,
employing about 32,000 people in 50 countries.  In 2001, its
consolidated sales amounted to EUR 8.7 billion generated by
its four activity sectors:  Pharmaceuticals, Chemicals,
Plastics and Processing.  Solvay is listed in the Euronext
100 index of top European companies.  Details are available
at www.solvay.com .

About Saft
Saft, with annual sales of over 550 million Euros, holds a
leading position in the worldwide marketplace for
self-contained energy solutions. Saft's product range
includes industrial, specialty and rechargeable battery
systems.  Saft provides standardized and custom-designed
batteries based on a large range of chemistries including
Nickel-Cadmium, Nickel-Metal Hydride and Lithium Ion.  For
additional information, contact Sarah Smart or visit the
Saft website at www.saftbatteries.com .

Customer Inquiries: Solvay Advanced Polymers, L.L.C.  4500
McGinnis Ferry Road Alpharetta, GA 30005-3914 USA Phone: 
800.621.4557 (USA only) or +1.770.772.8200
www.solvayadvancedpolymers.com SOURCE  Sikvat Advanced
Polymers, L.L.C CO:  Solvay Advanced Polymers, L.L.C.; Saft
ST:  Georgia SU: http://www.prnewswire.com 10/28/2002 12:50
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EVLN(DoE report praises hybrids)
[The Internet Electric Vehicle List News. For Public EV
 informational purposes. Contact publication for reprint rights.]
 --- {EVangel}
Honda Hybrids Outdistance Competition in 2003 Fuel Economy
Ratings All-New Accord Also Best in Class

TORRANCE, Calif., Oct. 29 /PRNewswire/ -- The Honda Insight
leads the automotive pack as the most fuel-efficient vehicle
sold in America as Honda gasoline-electric powered hybrid
models claimed four of the top five spots in the U.S.
Department of Energy's "Fuel Economy Guide for Model Year
2003" report released today.  In addition, the all-new 2003
Honda Accord earned the title as most fuel-efficient in the
"Midsize Cars" category.

The Honda Insight equipped with a 5-speed manual
transmission earned estimated fuel economy ratings of 61 mpg
city and 68 mpg highway according to the U.S. Department of
Energy.  The Insight with an advanced automatic continuously
variable transmission (CVT) earned an EPA rating of 57 mpg
city and 56 mpg highway.

The Insights were joined in the top five by the Civic
Hybrid, which went on sale in March.  The Civic Hybrid with
a 5-speed manual transmission earned an EPA city highway
ratings of 48/47 mpg and 46/51 when equipped with an
automatic CVT.

Honda's exclusive Integrated Motor Assist (IMA) hybrid
system used in both the Insight and Civic combines a
lightweight gasoline engine with a thin, lightweight
electric motor for enhanced efficiency and additional power
when needed.  The IMA system automatically recharges its
battery pack and never needs to be "plugged in" for
recharging.

The all-new Accord, outfitted with a 5-speed manual
transmission and 2.4-liter, 4-cylinder engine, increased
fuel economy to an EPA estimated 26 mpg city and 34 mpg
highway, from 26/32 in 2002, to top the midsize class. For
2003, the Accord underwent the most dramatic change in its
27-year history and boasts a larger 4-cylinder engine with 7
percent more horsepower and 6 percent more torque and class
leading low emissions levels.

For the first time, the mileage guide also contains a
category for fuel cell vehicles.  The Honda FCX is the lone
entry as the only fuel cell vehicle certified by the EPA. 
Mileage figures are pending.

Top fuel economy winners among 2003 model cars, according to
the Environmental Protection Agency. Mileage is city, then
highway, then combined:

1. Honda Insight (electric-gas hybrid, manual)  61/68/64
2. Honda insight (automatic)  57/56/56
3. Toyota Prius (electric-gas hybrid, automatic)  52/45/48
4. Honda Civic (electric-gas hybrid, manual)  48/47/48
5. Honda Civic (automatic)  46/51/48
6. Volkswagen Jetta Wagon (diesel, manual)  42/50/45
7. (Three-way tie) Volkswagen New Beetle, Volkswagen Golf,
   Volkswagen Jetta Wagon (all diesel with manual
   transmissions)  42/49/45
8. Toyota Echo (manual)  35/43/38
9. (Three-way tie) Volkswagen Golf, Volkswagen Jetta,
   Volkswagen Jetta Wagon (all diesel with automatic
   transmissions)  34/45/38
10. Volkswagen New Beetle (diesel, automatic)  34/44/38

SOURCE  American Honda Motor Company, Inc.  CO:  American
Honda Motor Company, Inc.  ST:  California SU:
http://www.prnewswire.com 10/29/2002 15:22 EST
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--- Begin Message ---
Hi Bob:  comments interspersed below - Chuck

----- Original Message -----
From: Bob Rice <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Sent: Monday, November 04, 2002 7:24 AM
Subject: Re: Newbie question re: Rabbit conversions


>   Hi Chuck, an' All;
>
>     Had to break in on this one; I know how the vacuum brake
thing can drive
> you bonkers! The #$%^ RACKET of a vacuum pump. Do yu have a
motor with a
> shaft sticking out the Arm. end, like I do, a sort of PTO
shaft? Good! If yu
> do. Get an old Diesel Rabbit Vacuum pump, systen is used to it
anyhow, it
> will feel right at home plated to the front of the motor, belt
driven, belt
> it down, to ;LARGE pully, about 6 inches, biggest one that will
fit in your
> limited space, and, say 2" on the motor. After all the motor
runs faster
> than the Diseasel did, so sloooow it down as best yu can.
Caviet here; The
> pump USED to lube off the Diesel's oil system, so ya gotta open
it up and
> goop it down, in it's crankcase, with  silicon grease, like
from my last CV
> joint repacking, That's what I had left over, seems to work. If
it starts to
> go dry, it did once,"-Eeek, Eeek, Eeek", it WILL tell you when
it's unhappy.
> Just crawl underneith, pull belt off, til yu get a chance to
dose it again.
> THEN ya appreciate what it duz for you. Just got a cheapo piece
of plastic
> line from True Value to run up to the Brake Vacuum pak. Yu
still have that,
> hopefully? You can muffle the 'Oink oink oink' of the "Output"
side of the
> pump with a few inches of the line, stuffed with cut up green
"Scrubbie"
> pads, a poor mans' 'Muffler"

This sounds like it would be one way to deal with getting vacuum.
Unfortunately, I do not have a shaft coming out the end of the
motor.  And I don't think it's an easy job to put one there
either - the whole motor has to come apart, and put in a
different rotor (?).
>
>     Voila! No electrical system, tanks regulaters, any of that
crap! And
> SILENT! And when the pump diaphram dies you can BUY THEM at any
VW place for
> about 15 bux! My kind of vacuum pump, 15 minute, 6 bolt
changeout as the
> pump is MADE to be repaired, a very Un American concept! With
3300 tare
> weight car yu need all the brakes yu can get! With me aboard,
took kit and
> RR work bag, figure car is over 3600 lbs. Scary! Yu bet, but it
works for
> me. Lots of thought of a newer car Evercells and AC drive,
regen down our
> 400 amp hills and STILL be under GVW, next time?

When we took the car apart last summer (2001) for its upgrades
and new batteries, we spent some time on the vacuum pump scene.
I now have a muffler can and found a place to put it.  You can
hardly hear the pump at all.  Another trick is to slice up a
rubber hose coming off the pump's exhaust port.  I don't know if
the muffler can scene is superior.  Maybe I'll do both! :-)
>
>     It's getting to be winter here, cold, relattively speaking,
in 20's at
> nite when I come home, motor LOVES it, barely runs warm,
batteries are doing
> fine. But the car is ether driving or charging so they stay
warm. One good
> thing about 1400 lbs of lead. Plan to run all winter, except
the snow and
> slush, don't wanna weaken the body with rust. The trusty Sentra
will be
> pressed into service if it snows again in CT, this year.

Yep, that 1400 lbs of lead is a lot coming down the road at you
in a small car.  My pack (96V of 6V floodeds) is about 1050lbs.
The car can reasonably well handle it (note I don't need vacuum
assist, even with all the hills around here, on a master cylinder
meant for vacuum assist).  Even when I was going 70mph last year
on Hi101 down on the flats on the Peninsula (south of SF), and
all of a sudden a wall of brake lights opened up in front of me,
it hauled down, although it was a bit of an effort.  Usually
don't have to press all that hard.  I also have carbon kevlar
linings in the drums in the rear, and semi-metallics and vented
slotted rotors for up front.  Don't use the stock organic
linings - they seem to be trash!  It would be nice to have power
brakes however.  Nice soft light-touch feeling...  What's left is
the control circuit.  I'm most likely to use the KTA vacuum
switch - does just what I want  (10-20psi hysterisis and is
adjustable); only problem is that it is big.  But I'll figure out
something good for mounting and hosing it all up - just take my
time.

All this business about the EV naysayers saying lead-acid won't
work, and therefore EVs won't work, in cold climates is a bunch
of whooey.  If you are driving and charging all the time, like
you are, the batteries stay exercised and warm.  If you need to,
you can install battery heaters.  And then, hey, NiMH works well
where it's cold, and I think so does nicad.  So there's lots of
solutions, but what is missing is a CAN-DO attitude.  The
nay-sayers ought to learn from you and others on this list that
it can be done.  If we wait for the OEM boys to wave their hands
and annoint electrics, we'll all be in our graves.

You may not have as much of a problem with rust and rot if you
are careful to keep the fenders flushed down at the car wash.  I
noticed in the winter when it rains here in NoCal, the front
fenders (down along the seams) would tend to get packed with
leaves, sand, and what have you spinning off the tires.  I think
all that stays damp and rots the paint and metal out.  So when I
have that packing up starting, I go down to the car wash and give
'er a good flush on the bottom and in the fenders, although I do
now have a full-length bellypan, so that may change the logistics
a bit.  I've also been pondering how hard it would be to mount
plastic wheel well inserts, like they have on newer cars, which
might help with the fenders getting loaded up with crud, and also
help with tire-induced turbulence up in the fenders.  Sigh,
another project to dream about...
>
>    Hope the above story can help others in the braking dept. OH
yeah! Didn't
> mention it before. The front grilles of Wabbits fiberglas off
smooth, adding
> a nice touch to yur conversion. Veery easy, quick way to seal
off the
> "engineroom" too. After all ,whatthehell DO you need a grille
for, anyhow?
> Grille crappy? JC Whitney sells nice Chinesey new ones for
around 25 bux, as
> I remember. Sand the plastic to get rid of the phony chrome, so
yur "glas
> resin will stick. Use the thick, fiberglas matt stuff, and ya
only need one
> pass. Bondo will fill in the imperfections. Sand it down nice
and you can
> get a job that looks nice. Get some Plasticote touch up spray
cans to match
> car's color. Good luck! A real afternoon "Feel Good" project.
Like replacing
> those plastic bumper ends on Rabbit, too.

I'd like to see a picture of this, as I'm intrigued.  I do have a
grille block-off, as supplied in the kit, and the grille has been
modified to make it all come together with the headlights behind
the grille rather than sticking out as in the VoltsRabbit kit.
>
>     Seeya...in those short hops around town, Rabbit!

Hope to run into ya sometime!, but not on the wrong end of that
1400lb pack!

Chuck Hursch
Larkspur, CA
www.geocities.com/nbeaa
http://www.austinev.org/evalbum/339.html
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