Send EV mailing list submissions to
        ev@lists.sjsu.edu

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
        http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
        [EMAIL PROTECTED]

You can reach the person managing the list at
        [EMAIL PROTECTED]

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of EV digest..."


Today's Topics:

   1. Re: kw and mpg conversion? (Roland Wiench)
   2. Re: kw and mpg conversion? (Roland Wiench)
   3. Re: Wanted: Photographs of EVs in Snow! (Dave Stensland)
   4. Re: kw and mpg conversion? (Jim L)
   5. Re: Good source for ducting supplies (Roland Wiench)
   6. Re: kw and mpg conversion? (Roland Wiench)
   7. Re: kw and mpg conversion? (David Roden)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2007 12:21:20 -0600
From: "Roland Wiench" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"




----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Jim L" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 11:23 AM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?


> Would that 300 watts per mile be a representitive number? Or an optimum
> number. I mean, would the average power consumption of the vehicles that 
> are
> built and talked about on this list consume about 300 watts per mile?
>
> Jim

For me, it is about 300 watts average.  If I attack a 2 mile 7 percent grade 
hill at 60 mph with my 7000 lb EV, then it could be over 1000 watts per 
mile.  Coming down that hill and and doing about another 2 mile roll out, it 
then becomes 0 watts per mile where the motor is still rotating which runs 
the rotating inverter-alternator which is still generating power for all the 
accessories.

Most of my driving is at 10 to 25 mph on non level streets which I always 
starting a down hill run first and then roller coast up for  the rest of the 
distance and may have only two stops a day. One stop at the destination and 
one stop at home.  No stop signs, no red lights and may drive for days 
without seeing any other cars on the road.

In the winter, I will use twice the energy pushing through a foot of snow, 
running three heating systems, seven fans, three pumps 14 external lights 
and over 50 instrument lights.

Roland
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Roland Wiench" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 9:29 AM
> Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
>
>
> > Hello Jim,
> >
> > You can use the Btu's per gallon method.  The average gasoline btu's is
> > about 115,000 btu's per gallon.  One kilowatt is 3412 btu's.
> > Engines vary in efficiency all the way down to 25% and a electric motor
> may
> > be as low as 80%.  So if all the mechanical efficiency of both rigs are
> > equal then:
> >
> > 115,000 x 0.25 = 28,750 btus for the engine
> >
> > 28,750 / 3412 = 8.426 kilowatts.
> >
> > 8.326 kw x 0.80 = 6.66 kw for a electric motor
> >
> > 6.66 kw / 746 = 8.9 hp
> >
> >
> > If you take everything at 100% efficiency then:
> >
> > 115,000 btu's / 3412 = 33.7 kw
> >
> > 33.7 kw / 746 = 45 hp
> >
> >
> > Lets say that you vehicle is getting 300 watts per mile at 60 mph then a
> > engine at 100% efficiency would have to get:
> >
> > 33.7 kw / 300 = 112 mpg
> >
> > Roland
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > From: "Jim L" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> > To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> > Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 9:49 AM
> > Subject: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
> >
> >
> > > Is there a formula for figuring out an approx energy use for a vehicle
> > > based on its mpg performance?
> > >
> > > For example, if a car got 25 mpg on average, what would be the amount 
> > > of
> > > kw needed to maintain highway speeds?
> > >
> > > If there is no easy formula, is there a range of kw usage that would
> cover
> > > most typically used vehicles? i.e. 'X' kwatts for a small aerodynamic
> > > vehicle to 'Y' kwatts for say a standard 1/2 ton pickup truck?
> > >
> > > I realize that this would probably only be estimates.
> > >
> > > Any Ideas?
> > >
> > > Jim
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > For subscription options, see
> > > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> > >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > For subscription options, see
> > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> >
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> 



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2007 12:26:31 -0600
From: "Roland Wiench" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"

There is a Uve's Electric Vehicle Calculator that is a up date from the old 
one.  It is at:

       http://www.geocities.com/hempev/EVCalculator.html?200629

It has all the controllers, motors and some vehicles we talk about on this 
list.

Roland



----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Travis Gintz" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 10:39 AM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?


> Not sure if this would help, but here's a nice calculator... and if
> you click on one of the links, it brings up the conversion equasions.
> http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/lab/8679/evcalc.html
>
> You can also "view source" in your browser see how he did the calcs.
>
> I used it for a small aerodynamic car, but ended up plugging in the
> aero values for my Honda VFR motorcycle. Not sure how accurate, but
> its a good way to figure out some basic stuff.
>
> Good luck.
> Travis
>
> On 10/12/07, Roland Wiench <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> > Hello Jim,
> >
> > You can use the Btu's per gallon method.  The average gasoline btu's is
> > about 115,000 btu's per gallon.  One kilowatt is 3412 btu's.
> > Engines vary in efficiency all the way down to 25% and a electric motor 
> > may
> > be as low as 80%.  So if all the mechanical efficiency of both rigs are
> > equal then:
> >
> > 115,000 x 0.25 = 28,750 btus for the engine
> >
> > 28,750 / 3412 = 8.426 kilowatts.
> >
> > 8.326 kw x 0.80 = 6.66 kw for a electric motor
> >
> > 6.66 kw / 746 = 8.9 hp
> >
> >
> > If you take everything at 100% efficiency then:
> >
> > 115,000 btu's / 3412 = 33.7 kw
> >
> > 33.7 kw / 746 = 45 hp
> >
> >
> > Lets say that you vehicle is getting 300 watts per mile at 60 mph then a
> > engine at 100% efficiency would have to get:
> >
> > 33.7 kw / 300 = 112 mpg
> >
> > Roland
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Jim L" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> > To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> > Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 9:49 AM
> > Subject: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
> >
> >
> > > Is there a formula for figuring out an approx energy use for a vehicle
> > > based on its mpg performance?
> > >
> > > For example, if a car got 25 mpg on average, what would be the amount 
> > > of
> > > kw needed to maintain highway speeds?
> > >
> > > If there is no easy formula, is there a range of kw usage that would 
> > > cover
> > > most typically used vehicles? i.e. 'X' kwatts for a small aerodynamic
> > > vehicle to 'Y' kwatts for say a standard 1/2 ton pickup truck?
> > >
> > > I realize that this would probably only be estimates.
> > >
> > > Any Ideas?
> > >
> > > Jim
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > For subscription options, see
> > > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> > >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > For subscription options, see
> > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> >
>
>
> -- 
>
> regards,
> Travis Gintz
> 1986 Honda VFR AC conversion
> Http://blog.evfr.net/
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> 



------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2007 14:33:42 -0400
From: Dave Stensland <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Wanted: Photographs of EVs in Snow!
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Hi Nikki,

Here are some other EV ideas with a winter/snow/holiday theme that your 
readers may enjoy. Feel free to search my website for other keywords to 
find additional stuff like this now or in the future. Just include a 
photo caption to megawattmotorworks.com for each use.

Thanks,
-Dave

Baker Electric Ad in the snow...
http://www.megawattmotorworks.com/resource.asp?func=display&resid=1414&tree=605

Milburn Ad with a snowman in it...
http://www.megawattmotorworks.com/resource.asp?func=display&resid=1424&tree=609

Electric Snowmobiles...
http://www.megawattmotorworks.com/display.asp?dismode=article&artid=263

Electric Vehicle Crosses Rockies During Freak Summer Blizzard...
http://www.megawattmotorworks.com/display.asp?dismode=article&artid=270

Snowy Ad -- 1911 Hupp-Yeats Electric...
http://www.megawattmotorworks.com/resource.asp?func=display&resid=1408&tree=624

The Art of Electric Snowmobiling...
http://www.megawattmotorworks.com/display.asp?dismode=article&artid=66

USU Snowmobile Design Cleans Up At National Event
http://www.megawattmotorworks.com/display.asp?dismode=article&artid=265

1913 Detroit Electric - Too Big to Come Down the Chimney
http://www.megawattmotorworks.com/resource.asp?func=display&resid=1429&tree=618

1914 - Let Santa Announce a Detroit Electric
http://www.megawattmotorworks.com/resource.asp?func=display&resid=1428&tree=618

1923 Walker Electric Truck - Santa Claus / Marshall Field
http://www.megawattmotorworks.com/resource.asp?func=display&resid=1404&tree=645





Nikki Bloomfield wrote:
> I am preparing the November/December edition of the BVS magazine and  
> would love a front cover picture (portrait format, high resolution,  
> 300DPI minimum) of an EV in the snow.
> 
> Ideally it needs to be being driven or with someone standing beside  
> it/working with it and have space at the top and bottom of the image  
> for text.
> 
> I can't offer any money for using it but of course, as always I'll  
> send you a copy of the magazine when it is printed. There is a postal  
> strike in the UK at the moment so it may not arrive until the new year!
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> Nikki.
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2007 11:34:22 -0700
From: "Jim L" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"

No stop lights? No traffic? Can I come live with you. I am in Vancouver BC
Canada, rush hour(week?) across the bridge near my house almost never stops.
As for stop lights. The local city planners response to anything is another
traffic light.
The idea around here seems to be if all the cars are parked in traffic jams
you won't have as many injuries in auto accidents!

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Roland Wiench" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 11:21 AM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?


>
>
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Jim L" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 11:23 AM
> Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
>
>
> > Would that 300 watts per mile be a representitive number? Or an optimum
> > number. I mean, would the average power consumption of the vehicles that
> > are
> > built and talked about on this list consume about 300 watts per mile?
> >
> > Jim
>
> For me, it is about 300 watts average.  If I attack a 2 mile 7 percent
grade
> hill at 60 mph with my 7000 lb EV, then it could be over 1000 watts per
> mile.  Coming down that hill and and doing about another 2 mile roll out,
it
> then becomes 0 watts per mile where the motor is still rotating which runs
> the rotating inverter-alternator which is still generating power for all
the
> accessories.
>
> Most of my driving is at 10 to 25 mph on non level streets which I always
> starting a down hill run first and then roller coast up for  the rest of
the
> distance and may have only two stops a day. One stop at the destination
and
> one stop at home.  No stop signs, no red lights and may drive for days
> without seeing any other cars on the road.
>
> In the winter, I will use twice the energy pushing through a foot of snow,
> running three heating systems, seven fans, three pumps 14 external lights
> and over 50 instrument lights.
>
> Roland
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > From: "Roland Wiench" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> > To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> > Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 9:29 AM
> > Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
> >
> >
> > > Hello Jim,
> > >
> > > You can use the Btu's per gallon method.  The average gasoline btu's
is
> > > about 115,000 btu's per gallon.  One kilowatt is 3412 btu's.
> > > Engines vary in efficiency all the way down to 25% and a electric
motor
> > may
> > > be as low as 80%.  So if all the mechanical efficiency of both rigs
are
> > > equal then:
> > >
> > > 115,000 x 0.25 = 28,750 btus for the engine
> > >
> > > 28,750 / 3412 = 8.426 kilowatts.
> > >
> > > 8.326 kw x 0.80 = 6.66 kw for a electric motor
> > >
> > > 6.66 kw / 746 = 8.9 hp
> > >
> > >
> > > If you take everything at 100% efficiency then:
> > >
> > > 115,000 btu's / 3412 = 33.7 kw
> > >
> > > 33.7 kw / 746 = 45 hp
> > >
> > >
> > > Lets say that you vehicle is getting 300 watts per mile at 60 mph then
a
> > > engine at 100% efficiency would have to get:
> > >
> > > 33.7 kw / 300 = 112 mpg
> > >
> > > Roland
> > >
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > > From: "Jim L" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> > > To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> > > Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 9:49 AM
> > > Subject: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
> > >
> > >
> > > > Is there a formula for figuring out an approx energy use for a
vehicle
> > > > based on its mpg performance?
> > > >
> > > > For example, if a car got 25 mpg on average, what would be the
amount
> > > > of
> > > > kw needed to maintain highway speeds?
> > > >
> > > > If there is no easy formula, is there a range of kw usage that would
> > cover
> > > > most typically used vehicles? i.e. 'X' kwatts for a small
aerodynamic
> > > > vehicle to 'Y' kwatts for say a standard 1/2 ton pickup truck?
> > > >
> > > > I realize that this would probably only be estimates.
> > > >
> > > > Any Ideas?
> > > >
> > > > Jim
> > > > _______________________________________________
> > > > For subscription options, see
> > > > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> > > >
> > >
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > For subscription options, see
> > > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> > >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > For subscription options, see
> > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> >
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>



------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2007 12:42:39 -0600
From: "Roland Wiench" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Good source for ducting supplies
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"

Hello Damon,

Those are the correct size blowers you are getting. I have the same type. 
If you remote mount them and if you have the room, bolt the square output to 
one side of the radiator support section or on to a panel that can be bolted 
some where else.

I went to a auto parts store and bought a 6 inch carb air cleaner housings 
and fasten them to the round input section of the blower.

For a hose take off, I use standard 2 inch diameter pvc pipe fittings that I 
glue to a plastic flat plate that bolted to the square section of the fan. 
You then can run standard pvc air hose to your motor which you have to make 
another adapter to fit the hose.

Use the standard air hose for the air input and only use a thicker 1/4 pvc 
flex hose for exhausting battery exhaust fumes.  These fumes will eat up the 
thinner standard air hose in no time.

You can get these air hoses and heavy duty pvc air hoses up to 1/4 inch 
thick which is normally use for vacuum systems from the Home Depot or other 
industrial hard ward stores.

Roland


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "damon henry" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "EV List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 10:52 AM
Subject: [EVDL] Good source for ducting supplies



I ordered two of these blowers from Surples Center
http://www.surpluscenter.com/item.asp?UID=2007101211410562&item=16-1279&catname=electric

I plan on using one for forcing air through my slightly undersized motor and 
one to replace the stock fan of the heating system in my 1970 Datsun truck. 
I am interested in plumbing both with something a little nicer then paper 
towel rolls and duct tape, and I'm wondering if anyone has any good sources 
for the different size ducting and fittings I will be needing.  I already 
know how to scrounge around at my local Home Depot, but if you know of any 
national specialty chains, online resources or local supply stores in the 
Portland Or area that carry a good selection please share.

thanks
damon
_________________________________________________________________
Help yourself to FREE treats served up daily at the Messenger Caf?. Stop by 
today.
http://www.cafemessenger.com/info/info_sweetstuff2.html?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_OctWLtagline

_______________________________________________
For subscription options, see
http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev 



------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2007 12:54:22 -0600
From: "Roland Wiench" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"

Hello Jim,

Sometimes about once a week I may have to stop when going to a shopping 
center.  I can travel over four miles on frontage roads off the main roads 
and the roads in front of the shopping center shops which has no stop 
lights.

If I have to go to many stores along this route, I just go from parking lot 
to parking lot for that distance.  It is sure nice to see the battery ampere 
usage is only 5 to 30 ampere usage.  I am normally driving in 1st gear with 
a overall ratio of 19.5:1 which keeps the motor rpm up to about 4000 to 5000 
rpm.

Roland


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Jim L" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 12:34 PM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?


> No stop lights? No traffic? Can I come live with you. I am in Vancouver BC
> Canada, rush hour(week?) across the bridge near my house almost never 
> stops.
> As for stop lights. The local city planners response to anything is 
> another
> traffic light.
> The idea around here seems to be if all the cars are parked in traffic 
> jams
> you won't have as many injuries in auto accidents!
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Roland Wiench" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 11:21 AM
> Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
>
>
> >
> >
> >
> > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > From: "Jim L" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> > To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> > Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 11:23 AM
> > Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
> >
> >
> > > Would that 300 watts per mile be a representitive number? Or an 
> > > optimum
> > > number. I mean, would the average power consumption of the vehicles 
> > > that
> > > are
> > > built and talked about on this list consume about 300 watts per mile?
> > >
> > > Jim
> >
> > For me, it is about 300 watts average.  If I attack a 2 mile 7 percent
> grade
> > hill at 60 mph with my 7000 lb EV, then it could be over 1000 watts per
> > mile.  Coming down that hill and and doing about another 2 mile roll 
> > out,
> it
> > then becomes 0 watts per mile where the motor is still rotating which 
> > runs
> > the rotating inverter-alternator which is still generating power for all
> the
> > accessories.
> >
> > Most of my driving is at 10 to 25 mph on non level streets which I 
> > always
> > starting a down hill run first and then roller coast up for  the rest of
> the
> > distance and may have only two stops a day. One stop at the destination
> and
> > one stop at home.  No stop signs, no red lights and may drive for days
> > without seeing any other cars on the road.
> >
> > In the winter, I will use twice the energy pushing through a foot of 
> > snow,
> > running three heating systems, seven fans, three pumps 14 external 
> > lights
> > and over 50 instrument lights.
> >
> > Roland
> > >
> > > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > > From: "Roland Wiench" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> > > To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> > > Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 9:29 AM
> > > Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
> > >
> > >
> > > > Hello Jim,
> > > >
> > > > You can use the Btu's per gallon method.  The average gasoline btu's
> is
> > > > about 115,000 btu's per gallon.  One kilowatt is 3412 btu's.
> > > > Engines vary in efficiency all the way down to 25% and a electric
> motor
> > > may
> > > > be as low as 80%.  So if all the mechanical efficiency of both rigs
> are
> > > > equal then:
> > > >
> > > > 115,000 x 0.25 = 28,750 btus for the engine
> > > >
> > > > 28,750 / 3412 = 8.426 kilowatts.
> > > >
> > > > 8.326 kw x 0.80 = 6.66 kw for a electric motor
> > > >
> > > > 6.66 kw / 746 = 8.9 hp
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > If you take everything at 100% efficiency then:
> > > >
> > > > 115,000 btu's / 3412 = 33.7 kw
> > > >
> > > > 33.7 kw / 746 = 45 hp
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Lets say that you vehicle is getting 300 watts per mile at 60 mph 
> > > > then
> a
> > > > engine at 100% efficiency would have to get:
> > > >
> > > > 33.7 kw / 300 = 112 mpg
> > > >
> > > > Roland
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > ----- Original Message ----- 
> > > > From: "Jim L" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> > > > To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> > > > Sent: Friday, October 12, 2007 9:49 AM
> > > > Subject: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > > Is there a formula for figuring out an approx energy use for a
> vehicle
> > > > > based on its mpg performance?
> > > > >
> > > > > For example, if a car got 25 mpg on average, what would be the
> amount
> > > > > of
> > > > > kw needed to maintain highway speeds?
> > > > >
> > > > > If there is no easy formula, is there a range of kw usage that 
> > > > > would
> > > cover
> > > > > most typically used vehicles? i.e. 'X' kwatts for a small
> aerodynamic
> > > > > vehicle to 'Y' kwatts for say a standard 1/2 ton pickup truck?
> > > > >
> > > > > I realize that this would probably only be estimates.
> > > > >
> > > > > Any Ideas?
> > > > >
> > > > > Jim
> > > > > _______________________________________________
> > > > > For subscription options, see
> > > > > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > > _______________________________________________
> > > > For subscription options, see
> > > > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> > > >
> > >
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > For subscription options, see
> > > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> > >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > For subscription options, see
> > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> >
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> 



------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Fri, 12 Oct 2007 14:59:58 -0400
From: "David Roden" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] kw and mpg conversion?
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

On 12 Oct 2007 at 12:21, two EVDL members wrote:

> > Would that 300 watts per mile be a representitive number? 
> 
> For me, it is about 300 watts average.

Excuse me for pointing this out, but these statemens make no sense.  

It's like saying that an ICE uses 250 horsepower per mile.  Perhaps you mean 
Watt-HOURS per mile.  If so, please use the correct units.  

http://www.evsource.com/articles/mind_your_units.php

Thanks to Edward Ang for posting this helpful page.  I heartily recommend it 
to all EVDL members.

David Roden - Akron, Ohio, USA
EVDL Administrator

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =
EVDL Information: http://www.evdl.org/help/
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = 
Note: mail sent to "evpost" or "etpost" addresses will not 
reach me.  To send a private message, please obtain my 
email address from the webpage http://www.evdl.org/help/ .
= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =




------------------------------

_______________________________________________
EV@lists.sjsu.edu
For subscription options, see
http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev

End of EV Digest, Vol 3, Issue 37
*********************************

Reply via email to