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Today's Topics:

   1. Re: Utah EV FAQ (David Dymaxion)
   2. rheostat type ([EMAIL PROTECTED])
   3. Delivery Van (Richard Sklarsky)
   4. Re: Is BMS needed for li-ion? (ProEV)
   5. Re: rheostat type (Morgan LaMoore)
   6. Re: Is BMS needed for li-ion? ([EMAIL PROTECTED])
   7. Re: rheostat type ([EMAIL PROTECTED])
   8. Re: GE ev1 controllers (Lee Hart)
   9. Re: Is BMS needed for li-ion? Is This a "Bad Boy" BMS? (Lee Hart)
  10. Re: Delivery Van (Lee Hart)
  11. Re: rheostat type (Lee Hart)
  12. Re: rheostat type (Roland Wiench)
  13. Re: Is BMS needed for li-ion? (Lee Hart)
  14. Re: Delivery Van (Peter Gabrielsson)
  15. Re: McGill University Electric Snowmobile Team website ((-Phil-))
  16. Re: Delivery Van (Bill Dube)
  17. Re: Delivery Van ((-Phil-))
  18. Re: McGill University Electric Snowmobile Team website
      (Peter Gabrielsson)
  19. Re: Is BMS needed for li-ion? (Bill Dube)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 09:45:41 -0800 (PST)
From: David Dymaxion <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Utah EV FAQ
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Many thanks for reading the FAQ. I didn't know about the electric snowmobile, 
excellent! I'll put that in. If you find out it gets an official web page 
please tell me and I'll put that in.

I also found a nice page about BYU's electric vehicle efforts: 
http://www.et.byu.edu/groups/electriccars/

----- Original Message ----
From: Brian Staffanson <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Sent: Monday, November 26, 2007 10:05:39 AM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Utah EV FAQ

USU has an electric snowmobile, though there isn't a website as far as
 I
could tell.  But here is an article which you could link too.

http://www.usu.edu/ust/index.cfm?article=14281

There are others as well.  If you would like more information, I could
possibly find more out.  This is an ongoing project.  They have
 participated
for the past 2 years, and it looks like it will continue.

Brian

On 11/24/07, David Dymaxion <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>
> This is especially aimed at Utahns, but others are welcome to read
 it,
> too.
>
> I have made a first cut at a FAQ for Utah EVs. Please check it out
 and
> give me your comments (here if general interest, otherwise private
 email
> please). My biggest
> worry is if I left out an EV company or group or resource in Utah --
> please let me know what I might have left out. For example, I haven't
> been able to find any recent University EV pages, like BYU used to
> have -- if anyone knows any good links for that I'd appreciate it.
 Thanks!
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> http://www.explodingdinosaurs.com/UtahEVFAQ.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>      
 
____________________________________________________________________________________
> Never miss a thing.  Make Yahoo your home page.
> http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>
_______________________________________________
For subscription options, see
http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev





      
____________________________________________________________________________________
Never miss a thing.  Make Yahoo your home page. 
http://www.yahoo.com/r/hs



------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 12:49:47 -0500
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: [EVDL] rheostat type
To: ev@lists.sjsu.edu
Message-ID:
        <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

What type of rheostat would I look for so I can turn down my Zivan 115 VAC
charger?

even 50 foot of cord didn't prevent tripping the breaker at a friends
house.

a rheostat is the right product?



------------------------------

Message: 3
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 10:19:30 -0800 (PST)
From: Richard Sklarsky <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: [EVDL] Delivery Van
To: ev@lists.sjsu.edu
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1

Hello EVers,

Long time monitor, first time writer.  I have a couple
of buisnesses and would like to use electric for local
deliveries and installations.  A cargo size van would
be ideal.  Is this a practical idea?  Any suggestiions
for someone who does not have the time to work on the
conversions themselves in the LA area? Also, just went
to the LA auto show.  What a disapointment.  Most of
the cars get less than 20mpg.  Yokohama did have
Tesla's car on display though. That was cool.

Thanks,

Richard



------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 13:36:55 -0500
From: "ProEV" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Is BMS needed for li-ion?
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
        reply-type=original

Hi All,

Lee wrote,

> One other option that I find interesting as an engineer. We recently
> talked about boost converters instead of buck converters for the motor
> controller. For a scooter, you can use a single large lithium cell and a
> boost converter to step this up to 36v or so. There is no need for a BMS
> with a single cell. :-)
> -- 

This sounds like a cool idea. It would certainly make the BMS and charging
simpler.

How about a Kokam 200 amp-hr HP cell.
http://www.kokam.com/product/product_pdf/high_power/PL-303_SLPB160460330H_200Ah_Grade.pdf

The 1 cell battery pack capacity would be 740 W-hrs. Boost it to 36 volts. 
You can
draw a peak of 800 amps * 3.7 volts  = 2,960 Watts which is 82 amps at 36
volts or about 4 horse power. Constant draw would be 400 amps times 3.7 
volts = 1,480 Watts which
is 41 amps at 36 volts or about 2 horsepower. Some sag and some losses in 
the boost converter will bring down the numbers some.

Charger is simple. A Universal AC input to 4.1 Volt DC. BMS is just some 
sort of low voltage sensor to turn off the Boost converter when the voltage 
gets too low. Voltage isn't the best way to judge state of charge but would 
be cheap and accurate enough for a little 5 LED state of charge meter.

Form factor would work for a electric bike. 18" by 13" by 3/4". Weight would 
be 11.5 lbs. Be about a $1,000 for the battery though.

Cliff
www.ProEV.com








------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 12:37:47 -0600
From: "Morgan LaMoore" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] rheostat type
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID:
        <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Actually, with a "smart" charger like a Zivan, adding a rheostat or
extension cord will probably make it take more current, not less.

The Zivan uses a "switched-mode power supply"; it tries to put a
constant current through the battery in the bulk charge. The more
output power it gives, the more input power it needs.

 If you add a rheostat between the charger and wall, it has a lower
input voltage, so it tries to take more input current to get the same
power so it can still charge the battery at the programmed rate.

If you add the rheostat between the charger and battery, it still puts
the same programmed current through the battery, but because of the
rheostat, the output voltage is higher (for bulk phase, at least).
That means that the output power is higher, so the input current must
be higher to make up for it. Again, this increase in input current
makes tripping breakers even more of a problem.

Adding a rheostat to a smart charger won't make it take less current
from the wall. Instead, look for an adjustable current limit in your
charger's manual. There may be something as simple as a potentiometer
on the charger that you can adjust, or it may require re-programming
your charger, which Zivan may not let you do.

-Morgan LaMoore



------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 11:39:05 -0600
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Is BMS needed for li-ion?
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

What planet are you on?
Controllers capable of low standby current draw, milspec temp range, and
automatic reset on brownout have been around for, like, 10+ yrs easy.

No controllers that I know of are protected against latchup when Vdd
exceeds a maximum (like 6V or so) and cannot recover themselves in this
case.  You may need some sort of circuitry on the input to prevent this.
 There are many different ways to handle it.  Also the controller may be
easy to find in milspec but the caps may be another matter.

Actually latchup is not guaranteed to come up as a problem.  If you were
planning on taking the risk of going without a BMS then a hacked BMS
without latchup protection or milspec temp range may meet your low
expectations.  You might make dozens and never see a problem in years. 
Or it may show problems in the first charge cycle.  Truth is it's hard
to predict if it will actually be a problem and the proper protection
isn't really all that complicated or expensive anyways.

Danny

----- Original Message -----
From: Bill Dube <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Date: Sunday, November 25, 2007 9:44 pm
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Is BMS needed for li-ion?
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>

> 
> >
> >I don't think it would be so hard to use a PIC or uC to monitor 
> those  LEDs
> >and do the voltage  adjustments...
> 
>         Until the controller comes on and then scrambles their 
> little brains with 300 kW of RFI.....
> 
>         How do they behave when the cell voltage goes below 2 
> volts? 
> Or the temperature swings below -40? Or above 100 C?
> 
>         Of course, it must draw less than a milliamp, on average.
> 
>         This is not nearly as easy as one might first think.
> 
> Bill Dube'
> 
>          
> 
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> 



------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 10:54:53 -0800
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
Subject: Re: [EVDL] rheostat type
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed

If it's an old house with old wiring it may not be able to handle the  
load.

Pete


On Nov 26, 2007, at 10:37 AM, Morgan LaMoore wrote:

> Actually, with a "smart" charger like a Zivan, adding a rheostat or
> extension cord will probably make it take more current, not less.
>
> The Zivan uses a "switched-mode power supply"; it tries to put a
> constant current through the battery in the bulk charge. The more
> output power it gives, the more input power it needs.
>
>  If you add a rheostat between the charger and wall, it has a lower
> input voltage, so it tries to take more input current to get the same
> power so it can still charge the battery at the programmed rate.
>
> If you add the rheostat between the charger and battery, it still puts
> the same programmed current through the battery, but because of the
> rheostat, the output voltage is higher (for bulk phase, at least).
> That means that the output power is higher, so the input current must
> be higher to make up for it. Again, this increase in input current
> makes tripping breakers even more of a problem.
>
> Adding a rheostat to a smart charger won't make it take less current
> from the wall. Instead, look for an adjustable current limit in your
> charger's manual. There may be something as simple as a potentiometer
> on the charger that you can adjust, or it may require re-programming
> your charger, which Zivan may not let you do.
>
> -Morgan LaMoore
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev



------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 10:55:30 -0600
From: Lee Hart <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] GE ev1 controllers
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Jack Riggi wrote:
> Lee I don't understand what you mean if i expect to switch the motors
> between series & parallel while you are under power I just want to
> go forward

You can permanently wire two motors in series or parallel. They just 
behave like one bigger motor, as others have described.

But some times people want to *switch* between series and parallel -- 
series to get more torque, parallel to get more speed. It works like an 
electric transmission.

If you want to do this, you need a big switch or contactor between the 
controller and motor. The only problem with this is that you MUST NOT 
switch it while the controller is running the motor! A motor is an 
inductive load, and if you switch it while current is flowing, you get 
tremendous amounts of arcing that will damage the controller and switches.

The same applies to forward/reverse switching, if you have a reversing 
contactor or switch between the controller and motor. You shouldn't 
switch it while current is flowing.

 > Where do you find higher voltage card? At the forklift junk yard?

That's one of the better sources. However, most fork lifts are low 
voltage (36v-72v) so these high voltage cards are hard to find.
-- 
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget the perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in    --    Leonard Cohen
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net



------------------------------

Message: 9
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 12:19:08 -0600
From: Lee Hart <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Is BMS needed for li-ion? Is This a "Bad Boy" BMS?
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Roger Daisley wrote:
> I would love to have a little green LED on each of my sixteen
> US-125's that would light up or flash when they are fully charged.

This is not hard at all. You need a green LED, a small resistor, and a 
zener diode, all in series across each battery. Pick the zener voltage 
so the LED lights when the battery reaches the desired "full" voltage.

For example, if "full" with your charger is 7.5 volts per 6v battery 
(2.5v/cell), and the LEDs you pick have a 2.4v drop at 20ma, then a 5.1v 
zener (1N5231B) in series makes the LED light at about 7.5 volts. Add a 
small resistor (like 10 ohms 1/4w watt) to serve as a fuse in case you 
accidentally hook one up backwards across a battery.

If you want it to be more precise and adjustable, use an "adjustable 
zener" IC like the TL431 and a couple resistors to set its voltage.

> (Flash: Rate dependent on voltage)

That's a little harder. The easiest way would be to buy an LED with the 
flashing circuit built into it. They are still cheap; less than $1 each.

-- 
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget the perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in    --    Leonard Cohen
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net



------------------------------

Message: 10
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 12:37:25 -0600
From: Lee Hart <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Delivery Van
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

Richard Sklarsky wrote:
> Hello EVers,
> 
> Long time monitor, first time writer.  I have a couple
> of buisnesses and would like to use electric for local
> deliveries and installations.  A cargo size van would
> be ideal.  Is this a practical idea?  Any suggestiions
> for someone who does not have the time to work on the
> conversions themselves in the LA area?

Can't help you in the LA area. But we are converting a GM cargo van to 
electric for use in a college area for vending machine deliveries. It's 
all low speed on-campus work, with short runs to the warehouse for more 
supplies -- perfect for an EV.

We are using a Zilla 2000amp controller, TransWarP 11" motor, with no 
transmission, and a big pack of plain old flooded golf cart batteries.

-- 
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget the perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in    --    Leonard Cohen
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net



------------------------------

Message: 11
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 12:32:56 -0600
From: Lee Hart <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] rheostat type
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
> What type of rheostat would I look for so I can turn down my Zivan 115 VAC
> charger?
> 
> even 50 foot of cord didn't prevent tripping the breaker at a friends
> house.
> 
> a rheostat is the right product?

The Zivan is a "smart" charger; if you lower the input AC voltage with a 
rheostat or variac, the Zivan will just *increase* the AX current it 
draws in an effort to maintain output current.

There are a couple things you can do to keep it from blowing AC 
breakers. First, you can turn down the *output* current. I don't know 
what model you have or if such a control is available, but look for it.

Second, you can add a big AC rated capacitor in parallel with the AC 
input to the charger. It must NOT be an electrolytic or motor starting 
type! The correct part is a metal can type, usually oil-filled, and 
built for motor *run* capacitors and with a voltage rating of 300vac or 
more. This slightly improves its power factor. The correct capacitance 
needs to be chosen to minimize the input AC current. You need an AC 
ammeter on the input to do this. It will probably take 10-50 microfarads.

Third, you can add a resistor in series with the charger's output to 
limit the current. This will be a big resistor, and it will get hot!
-- 
Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget the perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That's how the light gets in    --    Leonard Cohen
--
Lee A. Hart, 814 8th Ave N, Sartell MN 56377, leeahart_at_earthlink.net



------------------------------

Message: 12
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 11:57:18 -0700
From: "Roland Wiench" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] rheostat type
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"

A rheostat would have to be too large and may cost more then the battery 
charger.  If you are plug into a 20 amp 120 volt receptacle circuit then the 
smallest one would be a 20A x 120 V = 2400 watts at a 20 amp rating minimum. 
Normally if you are pulling all of 20 amps, then a unit should be at least 
rated for 125% over the load you are pulling  or 20 x 1.25 = 25 amp circuit 
breaker.

It is best to stay below the rating of a 20 amp circuit to a maximum of 16 
amps.

A transformer variac which can be plug into a 120v 20 amp receptacle circuit 
which the smaller bench type unit is rated for 0 to 140 volts at a maximum 
of 18 amps would be better than a large rheostat that you are burning up the 
power you are not using.

See www.surplussales.com for source of supply on these type of items.

Roland


----- Original Message ----- 
From: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Sent: Monday, November 26, 2007 10:49 AM
Subject: [EVDL] rheostat type


> What type of rheostat would I look for so I can turn down my Zivan 115 VAC
> charger?
>
> even 50 foot of cord didn't prevent tripping the breaker at a friends
> house.
>
> a rheostat is the right product?
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> 



------------------------------

Message: 13
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 13:14:28 -0600
From: Lee Hart <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Is BMS needed for li-ion?
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed

[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
> What planet are you on?
> Controllers capable of low standby current draw, milspec temp range, and
> automatic reset on brownout have been around for, like, 10+ yrs easy.

You will find that what they say on the data sheets isn't necessarily 
what you'll find in real life. It's a rare controller indeed that will 
actually reset and restart properly when faced with randomly rising and 
falling noisy power supply voltages.

Being "capable" of low supply current is not the same as actually 
delivering it. For one, the controller can't do anything when asleep or 
with its clock stopped. For another, the various external circuitry adds 
considerably to the total current.



------------------------------

Message: 14
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 11:14:30 -0800
From: "Peter Gabrielsson" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Delivery Van
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID:
        <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Contact left coast electric, they're in culver city.
http://leftcoastelectric.com/



On Nov 26, 2007 10:19 AM, Richard Sklarsky <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> Hello EVers,
>
> Long time monitor, first time writer.  I have a couple
> of buisnesses and would like to use electric for local
> deliveries and installations.  A cargo size van would
> be ideal.  Is this a practical idea?  Any suggestiions
> for someone who does not have the time to work on the
> conversions themselves in the LA area? Also, just went
> to the LA auto show.  What a disapointment.  Most of
> the cars get less than 20mpg.  Yokohama did have
> Tesla's car on display though. That was cool.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Richard
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>



-- 
www.electric-lemon.com



------------------------------

Message: 15
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 11:29:30 -0800
From: "(-Phil-)" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] McGill University Electric Snowmobile Team website
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
        reply-type=original

Wow, what a neat looking 3-phase pancake motor!    Wonder where that came 
from?

-Phil
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Tim Humphrey" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Sent: Monday, November 26, 2007 9:07 AM
Subject: Re: [EVDL] McGill University Electric Snowmobile Team website


>
>
>
>
> On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 15:35:07 -0800, "Andrew Kane" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> 
> wrote:
>>      Here is a picture of the bike with the CVT showing:
>> http://electricsnowmobile.mcgill.ca/images/cp06_15.jpg
>>
>>      Perhaps this is a picture of an earlier build, and the CVT was
>> later removed?
>>
>
> Nope, thats the new build.
>
> Here's a pic of the old build.... definately no CVT, and it looks to be 
> lead-acid powered.
>
> http://electricsnowmobile.mcgill.ca/English/photos_old.html
>
>
> --
> Stay Charged!
> Hump
> I-5, Blossvale NY
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> 



------------------------------

Message: 16
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 12:37:10 -0700
From: Bill Dube <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Delivery Van
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

Randy Holmquist has been doing a very nice job on "standard" 
conversions at a fair price for many years:

http://www.canev.com/

I think he has a standard product to do what you are asking for.

Bill Dube'


At 11:19 AM 11/26/2007, you wrote:
>Hello EVers,
>
>Long time monitor, first time writer.  I have a couple
>of buisnesses and would like to use electric for local
>deliveries and installations.  A cargo size van would
>be ideal.  Is this a practical idea?  Any suggestiions
>for someone who does not have the time to work on the
>conversions themselves in the LA area? Also, just went
>to the LA auto show.  What a disapointment.  Most of
>the cars get less than 20mpg.  Yokohama did have
>Tesla's car on display though. That was cool.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Richard
>
>_______________________________________________
>For subscription options, see
>http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev



------------------------------

Message: 17
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 11:38:07 -0800
From: "(-Phil-)" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Delivery Van
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1";
        reply-type=original

Sounds like you need an Electric G-van.  There are some out there!

Here's (one of) mine:  http://www.austinev.org/evalbum/preview.php?vid=1413

I've had 4 unsolicited offers to buy mine, all priced WAY lower than even my 
pack is worth alone.  I wouldn't even consider selling the pack for less 
than 25K, as I believe that these STM-5-200's are worth that.

I do have another van, with a bad lead-acid pack.  It would need a new pack 
and the motor repaired, but otherwise is functional.  I would consider 
selling it for the right offer.  With a new pack of floodies, it should have 
a 60 mile range.   It's a full-size 1-ton cargo van.  It has a cargo liner 
as well.

-Phil
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Richard Sklarsky" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Sent: Monday, November 26, 2007 10:19 AM
Subject: [EVDL] Delivery Van


> Hello EVers,
>
> Long time monitor, first time writer.  I have a couple
> of buisnesses and would like to use electric for local
> deliveries and installations.  A cargo size van would
> be ideal.  Is this a practical idea?  Any suggestiions
> for someone who does not have the time to work on the
> conversions themselves in the LA area? Also, just went
> to the LA auto show.  What a disapointment.  Most of
> the cars get less than 20mpg.  Yokohama did have
> Tesla's car on display though. That was cool.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Richard
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> 



------------------------------

Message: 18
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 11:52:45 -0800
From: "Peter Gabrielsson" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] McGill University Electric Snowmobile Team website
To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID:
        <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

here: http://www.lynxmotiontechnology.com/introtosema1.htm

On Nov 26, 2007 11:29 AM, (-Phil-) <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> Wow, what a neat looking 3-phase pancake motor!    Wonder where that came
> from?
>
> -Phil
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Tim Humphrey" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> To: "Electric Vehicle Discussion List" <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
> Sent: Monday, November 26, 2007 9:07 AM
> Subject: Re: [EVDL] McGill University Electric Snowmobile Team website
>
>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > On Sun, 25 Nov 2007 15:35:07 -0800, "Andrew Kane" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
> > wrote:
> >>      Here is a picture of the bike with the CVT showing:
> >> http://electricsnowmobile.mcgill.ca/images/cp06_15.jpg
> >>
> >>      Perhaps this is a picture of an earlier build, and the CVT was
> >> later removed?
> >>
> >
> > Nope, thats the new build.
> >
> > Here's a pic of the old build.... definately no CVT, and it looks to be
> > lead-acid powered.
> >
> > http://electricsnowmobile.mcgill.ca/English/photos_old.html
> >
> >
> > --
> > Stay Charged!
> > Hump
> > I-5, Blossvale NY
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > For subscription options, see
> > http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
> >
>
> _______________________________________________
> For subscription options, see
> http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev
>



-- 
www.electric-lemon.com



------------------------------

Message: 19
Date: Mon, 26 Nov 2007 12:52:51 -0700
From: Bill Dube <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Subject: Re: [EVDL] Is BMS needed for li-ion?
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List <ev@lists.sjsu.edu>
Message-ID: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

What both Lee and I are saying is that it just isn't quite as easy as 
it first appears to be.

         One of the things that come up is the intense (and spiked) 
magnetic field near the main cables and near the terminals of the 
battery. You really have no (or little) control over where the cables 
will be placed external to the battery. If one lays right on top of 
your BMS "brain" how will it behave? Where would you find the 
"magnetic field immunity" information in the spec sheet?

         What happens if you get an intermittent or high-resistance 
connection from one of the cells to the BMS?

         What happens if you momentarily short the pack, or some 
section of the pack?

         This stuff drives you nuts when you actually build and 
trouble-shoot a BMS for an EV.

         Bill Dube'

At 12:14 PM 11/26/2007, you wrote:
>[EMAIL PROTECTED] wrote:
> > What planet are you on?
> > Controllers capable of low standby current draw, milspec temp range, and
> > automatic reset on brownout have been around for, like, 10+ yrs easy.
>
>You will find that what they say on the data sheets isn't necessarily
>what you'll find in real life. It's a rare controller indeed that will
>actually reset and restart properly when faced with randomly rising and
>falling noisy power supply voltages.
>
>Being "capable" of low supply current is not the same as actually
>delivering it. For one, the controller can't do anything when asleep or
>with its clock stopped. For another, the various external circuitry adds
>considerably to the total current.
>
>_______________________________________________
>For subscription options, see
>http://lists.sjsu.edu/mailman/listinfo/ev



------------------------------

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End of EV Digest, Vol 4, Issue 73
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