----- Original Message -----
From: "Stephen Paul King" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "George Levy" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Sent: Sunday, September 08, 2002 6:26 PM
Subject: Re: Duplication Thought Experiment Involving Complementarity


> Dear George,
>
>     Interleaving.
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: George Levy
> To: Stephen Paul King
> Sent: Sunday, September 08, 2002 3:35 PM
> Subject: Re: Duplication Thought Experiment Involving Complementarity
>
>
> Stephen
>
> Your point is well taken. We can sample and send the original Kirk every
> microsecond. It would take one millisecond to send one thousand Kirks,
each
> copy sufficiently different for QM purposes, but not different enough for
> each Kirk to consciously know the difference.
>
> *
> [SPK]
>
>     Umm, I suspect that there is a minimul distance possible between the
> Kirk that is some function of the speed of light so that no arbitrary pair
> of Kirk Copies could communicate with each other such to exchage classical
> information regarding their experiences and thus generating a casual
> conflict. My point is that what ever spreading out in space that we can do
> with Kirk Clones, the Lorentz transform allows for spreading out in time.
> Thus any distribution is limited i such a way that they can not
communicate
> with each other as to determined which one is the "Real MacCoy", oh I
mean,
> Kirk. ;-)
> *
>
> I should have kept my units the same throughout (i.e., 6.6257 square
> kilometers) instead of alternating square miles and square kilometers. Can
> any one of you recognize this number?
>
> *
> [SPK]
>
>     C^2/1 microsec? Where the hell is the exp function key .... ;-)
> *
>
>
> I would like to discuss another difference between the thought experiment
> and QM. The thought experiment provides a discrete grid comprising 1024
> points. As a result, Kirk can occupy any one of 1024 discrete points. His
> position uncertainty is discrete. On the other hand, the uncertainty
> generated by QM events is continuous.
>
> George
>
> *
> [SPK]
>
>     Well, that is true BUT we always use some superselection rule to limit
> the size of the probability spectrum of our QM system so that we can use
the
> Lebesque (? spelling) and Gausian measures. Its most obvious illustration
we
> can find of this is the situation of Analouge to digital converters. ;-)
>
> Kindest regards,
>
> Stephen
>
>


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