Russell, I hate to discuss sci-fi (the daemon), but you wrote:
"The daemon computes the future - not just predicts or guesses, but
computes it exactly. "
So in your opinion the daemon 'knows'  (= applies for this exact comp) all
the unlimited details of a totally interconnected world. IMO she cannot be
different from "the world itself". And the computer usable for the daemon
could not be different from - (!!!) "the world itself" again.
The unlimited database applied by the infinite computing.
No neglects, no surprizes. Exact computation of the future. - Fine.

Then again:
"Tierra is not a model, it is a computational system that can be studied in
its own right."
Our definitions of 'model' are different. I call it (and used it that way) a
limited aspect of the totality, in the first place limited by the (actual?)
level of our continually increasing knowledge base. Since you hopefully do
not deal in sci-fi, your Tierra circumstances are limited at least in this
sense. You do limited computations and draw conclusions which in your word
do not seem to be appreciated as a limited outcome. Here is the punctum
saliens I make in reductionistic vs wholistic: to draw universal conclusions
upon model-studies.
Your position about Tierra is appreciable, which does not hit me as a
surprize. I just consider them "a step".
Even if you employ 'The Daemon" you could not get the totality: without
total input no total outcome.

"On the other hand, if we succeed, we will have a far better understanding
of creativity, plus probably have a powerful new technology to boot."
That I agree with and this is the reason for my appreciation of your
project. Just please, don't 'daemonize' it.

John Mikes


----- Original Message -----
From: "Russell Standish" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "John M" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Cc: "Stathis Papaioannou" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>;
<[EMAIL PROTECTED]>; <everything-list@eskimo.com>
Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2005 7:58 PM
Subject: Re: "Free Will Theorem"



Reply via email to