I think I can rephrase Kim's suggestion as follows. Rewards usually
reflect risks, people performing death-defying acts tend to be paid
handsomely, young males performing risky acts earn the admiration of
females (the James Dean stereotype), suicide bombers getting to spend
time with heavenly virgins and so on. Therefore, given QTI gives us
some guarantee that we won't experience death, then doesn't this
encourage QTI followers to do risky things?

The trouble with the notion of QTI suggesting we should all do risky things
is much the same as the argument I give against quantum suicide as a
way of winning the lottery in my book. Most of the avenues of survival
from risky actions are in fact at considerable cost to health, social
standing etc. Only if these costs were outweighed by the benefits
accrued by the risky action is it worth doing. In fact the decision
procedure is not all that different to if QTI were not true - if
anything it make risky actions somewhat less favourable, since QTI
guarantees that you experience negative outcomes from some failed
action rather than having death as a way out.

Cheers

On Wed, Jan 04, 2006 at 11:27:07PM +1100, Stathis Papaioannou wrote:
> Kim Jones writes:
> 
> 
> > OK - so transferring this set of increasingly demented versions of  me to 
> >a multiverse framework where they are all existing in parallel,  you are 
> >saying that - as I age - I can expect a gradual fadeout to a  
> >near-vegetative twilight state due to the odds favoring my ending up  in 
> >the highest achievable state of normality each time? This to me  
> >highlights my question then - wouldn't I be better off doing a James  Dean 
> >or an Elvis; living fast, "dying" young and keeping up my  probability 
> >measure of ending up in universes where I am similarly  constituted with 
> >all my faculties intact? Like this I would expect to  take advantage of 
> >the system and be a Cassanova or a Lothario for  eternity. That's what I 
> >call "continuity"!
> 

-- 
*PS: A number of people ask me about the attachment to my email, which
is of type "application/pgp-signature". Don't worry, it is not a
virus. It is an electronic signature, that may be used to verify this
email came from me if you have PGP or GPG installed. Otherwise, you
may safely ignore this attachment.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
A/Prof Russell Standish                  Phone 8308 3119 (mobile)
Mathematics                                    0425 253119 (")
UNSW SYDNEY 2052                         [EMAIL PROTECTED]             
Australia                                http://parallel.hpc.unsw.edu.au/rks
            International prefix  +612, Interstate prefix 02
----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Attachment: pgpPJ5lEF4KYt.pgp
Description: PGP signature

Reply via email to