Hi Folks,

    The following is from the wiki page 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_pseudo-telepathy . 

"In their 1999 paper,[1] Gilles Brassard, Richard Cleve and Alain Tapp 
demonstrated that winning quantum strategies can exist in simple games for 
which in the absence of quantum entanglement a winning strategy can result only 
if the participants were allowed to communicate. The term quantum 
pseudo-telepathy was later introduced[2] for this phenomenon. The prefix 
'pseudo' is appropriate, as the quantum non-locality effects that are at the 
heart of the phenomenon do not allow any transfer of information, but rather 
eliminate the need to exchange information between the players for achieving a 
mutual win in the game."

    It is this last point that is of upmost importance. Quantum phase 
entanglement allows for the equivalent of information exchange to occur without 
any kind of physical or substance connection to necessarily occur. The next 
step is to figuring out how entanglement can be partitioned such that, for 
example, a pair of quantum systems can have some but not all of their 
respective degrees of freedom entangled so that some appearance of classical 
behavior to obtain.
    It is my suspicion that this idea will help us solve the measurement 
problem with a form of graded or graduated decoherence where the notion of a 
mutually consistent set of bases shape the observables of large collection of 
quantum systems such that they are mutually consistent with each other up to 
some maximum that relates to difference induced in the phase of wave functions 
by accelerations or, equivalently, curvature. This last idea is discussed here: 
link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.51.1401

    We are using the notion of a "winning strategy" in an interaction game as 
equivalent to a synchronization of the observations - the internal aspects-  
that we would associate with pairs of quantum systems. We could then iterate 
and use other concurrency strategies to model the interactions of an 
arbitrarily large but finite collections of quantum systems. All of this is in 
the attempt to overcome the "no windows" property of quantum systems.

Kindest regards,

Stephen

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