>i don't see a much of a connection between those statements.
>Complexity could be necessary but insufficient. It is,
>for instance, difficult to see how you could have
>simple colour qualia. Colours represent a lot of intormation.

Yes, I agree, complexity could be necessary but insufficient. Just as
complex arrangements of inorganic molecules do not lead to organisms,
but in particular cases of organic molecules, they lead to cells, some
cells can lead to animals, some animals are vertebrates, some
vertebrates are like us, etc. Complex arrangements of daisy cells
don't lead to a gorilla, etc.

I'm not sure that color represents any information per se, it could be
that the visual subject, informed by color, informs the cognitive
subjects, which projects it's own semantic associative content on top
of the visual qualia. The 'information' may be separable qualia.

>They could report one thing whilst experiencing or
>having experienced another. Let's they have bits
>of their brain replaced by functionally equivalent
>silicon; let's also say that silicon can't have qualia.
>Then, as the replacement procedes, their qualia
>will fade...but they will continue to report them,
>because of the functional equivalence.

Right, yes. That's why I was saying it would come close to convincing
me (rather than making me sure). In my view, silicon could have
qualia, I would just guess that it doesn't scale up to rich subjective
depth. The way we build with silicon, it never reaches the state of
becoming a living organism, so I think it's likely limited to pre-
biotic qualia. Permittivity and permeability perhaps, wattage.


On Jul 21, 3:26 pm, 1Z <peterdjo...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> On Jul 11, 2:52 am, Craig Weinberg <whatsons...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >  I'm saying that
> > the potential for awareness must be built in to matter at the lowest
> > level or not at all. Complexity alone cannot cause awareness in
> > inanimate objects, let alone the kind of rich, ididopathic phenomena
> > we think of as qualia.
>
> i don't see a much of a connection between those statements.
> Complexity could be necessary but insufficient. It is,
> for instance, difficult to see how you could have
> simple colour qualia. Colours represent a lot of intormation.
>
> > The only thing that would come close to convincing me that a
> > virtualized brain was successful in producing human consciousness
> > would be if a person could live with half of their brain emulated for
> > a while, then switch to the other half emulated for a while and report
> > as to whether their memories and experiences of being emulated were
> > faithful.
>
> They could report one thing whilst experiencing or
> having experienced another. Let's they have bits
> of their brain replaced by functionally equivalent
> silicon; let's also say that silicon can't have qualia.
> Then, as the replacement procedes, their qualia
> will fade...but they will continue to report them,
> because of the functional equivalence.

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups 
"Everything List" group.
To post to this group, send email to everything-list@googlegroups.com.
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to 
everything-list+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit this group at 
http://groups.google.com/group/everything-list?hl=en.

Reply via email to