Citeren meekerdb <meeke...@verizon.net>:

On 12/16/2011 8:42 AM, Bruno Marchal wrote:
If you think of a quantum multiverse, then that argument would work if the brain is a quantum computer. If it is classical, its states can be considered as having been prepared in the classical base,


But "prepared in the classical base" just means decoherence makes the state (approximately) orthogonal to the counterfactual bases. You seem to be assuming that because the brain is quasi-classical, that it doesn't exist in the other branches?

Brent

Indeed, and the branches can be grouped together in sets such that the person is unaware of differences within one set. If the pixels on the screen representing the letters you read were arranged slightly differently, your brain would detect these differences, but you would still see exactly the same letters as long as the differences are small enough. The same patterns will be recognized.

So, in general, when we perceive something, we don't make "sharp" measurements and as a consequence, we are not located in what we normally would call a single branch of the multiverse. Rather, the brain-environment state will be in a complicated entangled state, and that state itself defines the computation that has been carried out.

Saibal
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