On Wed, Feb 27, 2013 at 1:33 PM, Craig Weinberg <whatsons...@gmail.com>wrote:

> Even if it could [ tell the difference between a audio and a video file]
> that would only represent a more advanced file analysis function, not any
> kind of audio or video sensitivity.
>

Please explain the difference between the two.

>> when I play a video on a web page my computer always sends the audio
>> signal to the speaker and the video signal to the screen and not the other
>> way round. How can it do that it it doesn't know if the output should go to
>> the screen or speaker? Is it just lucky?
>>
>
> > Uh, no. The web browser is explicitly instructed by the code of the file
> which application list is appropriate.
>

I don't know what to make of that. You're saying that if there was no audio
or video properties in the file then the computer could not tell if it was
audio or video, but if there are no audio or video properties in it what on
earth makes it a audio or video file? It's like saying you can't tell if a
book is written in English if there are no English words in it!

> The computer has no idea what audio is.
>

It must be grand being a "hard problem" theorist because it's the easiest
job in the world bar none, no matter how smart something is you just say
"yeah but it's not conscious" and there is no way anybody can prove you
wrong.

> A computer can only look at everything one way - as a binary code.
>

And yet a computer can display music, speeches, sound effects, text, and
video of anything.  Apparently the word "look" has some weird mystical
meaning for you that it doesn't have for me.

> but the computer has no experience either way.
>

It must be grand being a "hard problem" theorist because it's the easiest
job in the world bar none, no matter how smart something is you just say
"yeah but it's not conscious" and there is no way anybody can prove you
wrong.

> A computer doesn't know anything about the world beyond its peripherals.
>

It must be grand being a "hard problem" theorist because it's the easiest
job in the world bar none, no matter how smart something is you just say
"yeah but it's not conscious" and there is no way anybody can prove you
wrong.

> It can't tell whether a bitstream ends up in your ears or eyes. It
> doesn't know if it's running on a laptop in the middle of a warzone or on a
> virtual server in a data center.
>

It must be grand being a "hard problem" theorist because it's the easiest
job in the world bar none, no matter how smart something is you just say
"yeah but it's not conscious" and there is no way anybody can prove you
wrong.

> You don't need file extensions in every OS, but the fact that they exist
> at all should show you [...]
>

that computer technology advances and things that were once necessary for
those machines to operate correctly no longer are.

> There is no condition which will make a machine queasy
>

It must be grand being a "hard problem" theorist because it's the easiest
job in the world bar none, no matter how smart something is you just say
"yeah but it's not conscious" and there is no way anybody can prove you
wrong.


> > our sense of queasiness is not in any way a logical result of a data
> mismatch.
>

You are entirely wrong. From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Motion_sickness

"When feeling motion but not seeing it (for example, in a ship with no
windows), the inner ear transmits to the brain that it senses motion, but
the eyes tell the brain that everything is still. As a result of the
discordance, the brain will come to the conclusion that one of them is
hallucinating and further conclude that the hallucination is due to poison
ingestion. The brain responds by inducing vomiting, to clear the supposed
toxin."

  John K Clark

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