On 10/30/2013 4:05 AM, Telmo Menezes wrote:
On Wed, Oct 30, 2013 at 2:51 AM, meekerdb <meeke...@verizon.net> wrote:
On 10/29/2013 4:17 PM, Telmo Menezes wrote:

But this is how I see the concept of √úbermensch. The idea got horribly
distorted by subsequent political events. The ideal of √úbermensch is a
human that transcends the illusion and becomes aware of it's true (1p)
nature. I also see it as close to Buddhist ideas.


I certainly agree that Nietzsche's Ubermensch has been horribly distorted.
Although anybody who is claimed as a philosophical ancestor by the Nazis and
Ayn Rand must have been doing something wrong. :-)
Just to defend Ayn Rand a bit :) :

The Nazis and Ayn Rand are ideological opposites. The former were for
total state, while the latter was against state. Also there's the
small matter of genocide vs. writing some books. Recent events have
been showing that Rand was on to something with many of her ideas:

"We are fast approaching the stage of the ultimate inversion: the
stage where the government is free to do anything it pleases, while
the citizens may act only by permission; which is the stage of the
darkest periods of human history, the stage of rule by brute force."
-- Ayn Rand

My main problem with Rand is that I find objectivism childish. She was
a hardcore Aristotelian and didn't understand the problem with her "no
contradictions" dogma. But I'm a lover of individual freedom, so I
have a soft spot for her.

But like the Nazis she conceived freedom as freedom from social constraint and to dominate or destroy others without remorse as the Untermensch. Are you familiar with William Hickman? Rand was:

"At the time, she was planning a novel that was to be titled The Little Street, the projected hero of which was named Danny Renahan.According to Rand scholar Chris Matthew Sciabarra, she deliberately modeled Renahan - intended to be her first sketch of her ideal man - after this same William Edward Hickman. Renahan, she enthuses in another journal entry, "is born with a wonderful, free, light consciousness -- [resulting from] the absolute lack of social instinct or herd feeling. He does not understand, because he has no organ for understanding, the necessity, meaning, or importance of other people ... Other people do not exist for him and he does not understand why they should." (Journals, pp. 27, 21-22; emphasis hers.)"

http://michaelprescott.freeservers.com/romancing-the-stone-cold.html

Brent


  But the Buddhist idea is
to withdraw from the world.  Nietzsche's idea is to engage it, amor fati.
The will to power is the creative drive. To create art. To create oneself.
Well put.

Telmo.

Brent

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