On 12 Nov 2013, at 04:35, LizR wrote:

On 12 November 2013 16:03, meekerdb <meeke...@verizon.net> wrote:
On 11/11/2013 6:38 PM, LizR wrote:

Benjamin Button lived his life in reverse.

Oh, right, like the guy in Martin Amis' "Time's Arrow" (itself a rip off from "An Age" by Brian Aldiss). Presumably according to QTI he's at the end of an infinite future lifetime, or whatever? But since he's unphysical I guess we can say what we like about him.

"The Curious Case of Benjamin Button" was by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1922).

Oh well, he gets precedence, then. But in any case I don't see any particular relevance, probably that's my fault...
So I'll ask you the same thing I asked Quentin, what's you inference from the fact you, and every body you've ever heard of died before reaching age 150?

My normal inference is that everyone dies. Apparently the QTI throws doubt on this by pointing out that we have only sampled an infinitesimal proportion of the available branches of the multiverse, and that in another infinitesimal portion there might be people who live forever (somehow).
But doesn't QTI imply that everybody is immortal, as Jason infers. Did you read "Divided by Inifinity" yet?

Yes it does, but only in infinitesimal slivers of the multiverse, which is what I was trying to say in my roundabout way.

If you die in the vast majority of the histories, you will still survive with a probability one in the 1p-view, even if that happens in infinitesimal portion of the computations. The logic G says that all worlds access a cul-de-sac world, but the logic of probability (Bp & Dt) abstracts from all cul-de-sac world. If you are not reconstituted in Moscow, in the WM-duplication,, then P(Washington) = 1.

What the comp-immortality looks like is hard to evaluate, because we don't know how to evaluate the probabilities when amnesia, and backtracking, are allowed. Comp remains consistent with different beliefs on this, and that will lead to quite different comp "religions".

Bruno




No I skimmed it, but I hope / think I get the point. Is there anything else I should be taking from it apart from "this is what quantum immortality might look like, assuming a nearby gamma ray burst and so on" ?
What is your inference from the fact that everywhere you've ever travelled has been on or near the surface of a congenial planet supplied with air, water and all the necessities of life?
That I'm the product of evolution on this planet.

Right, you're here in an extremely unlikely situation if you take random samples from the universe. I was trying to draw a parallel here, if I can just remember what it was...



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