On Sat, Jan 4, 2014 at 9:37 PM, LizR <lizj...@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 5 January 2014 15:01, Jason Resch <jasonre...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> What is moving if it's not time?
>>
>> Our minds are, from one slice in spacetime to the next.
>>
>
> Jason,
>
> I agree completely with all your other replied to Edgar, but I think the
> above one could be misleading. I know what you mean (it's similar to the
> famous phrase about our minds "crawling up our worldlines") but it creates
> just the sort of mental picture that presentists will leap on with cries of
> "AHA! So it does move after all!!!"
>
> So, let me just put the record straight. Our minds are NOT moving from one
> slice of space-time to the next. Nothing is. However, the slices are
> connected in a manner determined by the laws of physics (which could, for
> example, be demonstrated by viewing the whole schmeer as a Feynman diagram,
> as you mentioned) and this is sufficient to give us the illusion that there
> is a "moving present moment". In practice (if we leave aside a comp type
> explanation and assume our minds are generated by the activity of our
> brains) then that brain activity is sufficient to give a powerful illusion
> that we are "moving through time". But, as the guy in "Memento"
> demonstrates, this is an merely illusion, caused by the persistence of
> memory, which effectively gives us a physical connection to the past via
> the arrangement of the worldlines of the molecules making up our physical
> structure.
>
>
Liz,

Thanks for making that clarification, which is important.  You interpret my
meaning correctly, it is not that the value is moving up along the y-axis
in the graph of the function y=2x+7, but that for increasing x's, there are
increasing y's.  In the same sense, we can interpret that as one looks at
ascending time-slices, you will see accumulating memories, etc.

Edgar's assertion that we "wouldn't feel like we are moving through time"
unless time "really moves", contradicts computationalism, which his theory
supposedly assumes. (Actually, I see no way at all how successively
creating and and then deleting successive slices in time even could explain
our sensation of moving through time.)

Jason

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