--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Michael Jackson  wrote:
>
> What martial arts have you studied?

Many, never to the black belt level, although I was 
a brown belt in karate and was once in a match against
Chuck Norris the year he first became World Karate 
Champion, before he got into being a bad actor. He 
whupped my ass so badly I don't even want to discuss 
it. :-)

But along the way, without really mastering any of
them, I studied Judo, Karate, Aikido, Iado, and 
Kenjutso. I'll probably try to teach Maya a few 
Judo falls and throws to see if she's interested,
and if so, then steer her to good kids' Judo or
Aikido classes. I really *do* believe that learn-
ing the martial arts improves balance and self-
confidence. 


> ________________________________
>  From: turquoiseb 
> To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
> Sent: Sunday, January 13, 2013 2:38 PM
> Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: Faux feminists are part of the problem, not part 
> of the solution
>  
> --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "Susan"  wrote:
> >
> > Barry, I think you have mentioned this before - about how 
> > Rama really encouraged women to become independent and 
> > strong. This good. And things are changing so for young 
> > girls these days at least in the West.
> > 
> > But the fact remains that many men are indoctrinated by 
> > their culture to treat women poorly, to keep them in lower 
> > wage positions, to ignore their needs, and to pay them 
> > less for similar work. It is great that some women refuse 
> > to accept all this, but it takes lots of effort to do this, 
> > to go against the cultural norms (many of which are really 
> > subtle and go unnoticed). Women often have to work harder, 
> > put more time and energy in, and get pushy just to get 
> > equal rights in any area of life. It is tiring and not 
> > possible for some people especially if they are raising 
> > children and must put their energies there, too. 
> 
> I agree with everything you have said. 
> 
> > It is not easy, and not for some types of people in 
> > particular, introverts and such. Also, some women, like 
> > men, are not all that talented, they just want fair 
> > treatment for what they do at work and in life, too. 
> > they wob't be president of a company, ever, nor should 
> > they have to push for that just to be treated fairly.
> 
> I hope my point was that these women I knew were 
> treated fairly because they refused to entertain the 
> idea of *not* being treated fairly. Rather than 
> dwell on the obvious -- that misogyny and discrim-
> ination exist -- they focused on what they could
> personally do to not be affected by it. True, that
> is not everyone's path in life, but I confess to
> being more impressed by those who just get all Nike
> on misogyny's ass and "Just Do It," rather than
> talking about it. 
> 
> *Admittedly*, somebody's got to talk about it, to 
> get it before the eyes of a dumb public so they'll
> become more aware of the problems. But you'll have
> to excuse me if I believe that a few good *examples*
> of women bucking the system and succeeding *anyway*
> possibly does more to resolve the problems than 
> bitching about the system.
> 
> > So great for your women friends, and I agree success is 
> > the best remedy for the women and for society. But let's 
> > recognize that it would help and is not being whiny or 
> > demanding on the part of women if they want society and 
> > men to behave differently. It should not be a burden 
> > only on women to succeed in spite of the unfairness 
> > around them. Society should help out, too.
> 
> Agreed. And I hope that it does so. At the same time,
> I cannot help but applaud my friends who found a way
> to step out from under that burden and succeed anyway,
> long before society got clueful enough to help them
> out. 
> 
> I'm in the peculiar position of helping to raise a 
> four-year-old girl in this world. The other people in
> my extended family are in charge of teaching her genteel
> manners and other things, but we've all pretty much 
> agreed that I'm going to be the one to teach her
> martial arts. 
> 
> Starting early. If I do a good enough job, she will never
> have to use them to defend herself in her entire life.
> But they'll teach her balance, in many ways. And knowing 
> that she *could* defend herself will IMO add greatly to 
> her self confidence and her ability to find her own way 
> in life, safely and successfully. 
> 
> > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb  wrote:
> > >
> > > As you can probably tell, I have fairly strong views on
> > > the problem of rape and the subjugation of women. This 
> > > 'tude was largely created as a result of being good 
> > > friends with a number of very strong women in the Rama
> > > trip. Rama -- whatever his failings in many areas --
> > > was a strong proponent of women's rights. He had all of
> > > his students -- male and female -- study martial arts,
> > > and work on their careers, such that they didn't have
> > > to be the victims of anyone, whether it be an employer 
> > > or a criminal. 
> > > 
> > > As a result, many of the women I studied with -- and 
> > > often worked with and went to dojos with as well -- 
> > > turned into what I'd call "real feminists." They didn't
> > > whine. They didn't *blame* men. Instead they became 
> > > more successful than the men, made more money than the
> > > men, and kicked more ass than the men. One of my good 
> > > friends from this period worked with me down on Wall 
> > > Street, and one night as she left work late, four guys 
> > > decided to try to rape her. As Ahnold said so well in 
> > > Predator, "Bahd idea." She was a third-degree karate 
> > > black belt, and sent them first to the hospital, and 
> > > then to jail. 
> > > 
> > > Compare and contrast to women who fly off the handle
> > > and scream "Misogyny" over the use of a word they don't
> > > like, or over some man treating the women he encounters
> > > *the same way he treats the men he encounters*. The real 
> > > feminists I knew didn't *expect* to be treated any 
> > > differently than the men around them, and so they weren't. 
> > > No one cut them breaks, and no one treated them any 
> > > differently than they did the guys. Many of these women 
> > > are now the heads of companies that still contain other 
> > > women employees complaining that they're being 
> > > "discriminated against," women who had *exactly* the same 
> > > chance to advance in those companies as my friends did. 
> > > 
> > > Complaining and bitching never changed anything. DOING
> > > something is what changes things. My friends took 
> > > responsibility for their own careers, and their own
> > > safety, and it *worked* for them. They would be as 
> > > turned off by the sari-wearing, walk-several-paces-
> > > behind-their-Raja-husbands women we see in the TMO 
> > > as I am.
> > > 
> > > I still remember the day when a female friend of mine
> > > in the TM movement stood up in a lecture when Maharishi
> > > asked for "Good news," and informed him that she had
> > > just been granted her *second* Ph.D. Maharishi's 
> > > response was, "Very good. That will make you a better
> > > conversationalist for your husband." She left that
> > > lecture -- and the TMO -- immediately after hearing
> > > that. She now has three Ph.D.'s, a shitload of books
> > > and published articles under her belt, and -- still --
> > > no husband. She never needed one. 
> > > 
> > > I never heard *her* bitch and whine about men and
> > > male chauvinism and misogyny, either, even though she
> > > had ample cause to do so. She put her efforts into
> > > more productive pursuits, namely, "Success is the
> > > best revenge."
> > >
> >
>


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