So were the sidhalands a nationwide or world wide thing? Were they supposed to 
be constructed by volunteer labor and all that?




________________________________
 From: "doctordumb...@rocketmail.com" <doctordumb...@rocketmail.com>
To: FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com 
Sent: Friday, March 15, 2013 11:23 PM
Subject: [FairfieldLife] Re: MUM kid expelled for pot but the foreign kids get 
no punishment.
 

  
Curtis returns in a week - In the meantime, I'll share my experiences. Curtis I 
think was at the Florida location, where a guy died during the construction 
phase. A group of about 30 of us were near Waverly, MO, and there was at least 
one other project going on at the time, near St. Louis.

Basically a work/study program when I first went there. We had a 40 or so room 
facility to design and build, and about 14 acres of organic strawberries to 
plant and tend to, later adding the adjacent apple orchard for apple juice 
production. Officially, the building we built was a Capital of the A of E, and 
the agricultural stuff was the Siddhaland.

After six months of work, we got the siddhis, by attending the TM Center in 
Kansas City, and doing the residence requirement for the flying block at MIU 
(MUM). Then we returned to the facility for six more months.

It was austere to say the least, more so for the sidha-wannabes, than the Guvs. 
We lived in a standalone garage. We did not have heat in the Winter, except for 
coal,  nor hot water for bathing. The Guvs did. Same deal for any cooling in 
the Summer. We didn't much care - we were a close group, working long hours, 
rounding 2 x 2, and getting the hang of the TMSP while doing either 
construction, or farming. 

I remember if you were fast, you could weed one and a half rows of strawberries 
per day. They were big rows. Your hoe was your prize (lol). We soon recognized 
which brands had a higher grade steel in the blade, and held their edge. In the 
Winter, tending the berries meant tearing straw off of big rolled bales on the 
back of a tractor, to insulate the plants. Dirty hard work.

It was also a great experience to live with the Guvs up close. I remember a 
couple of them we all liked, several who were total dicks, and the rest fell 
somewhere in the middle. Certainly not a rousing advertisement for going on TTC.

One day, while considering working for the Movement, I decided that instead of 
working, I'd take my boombox, put on something loud - probably the Talking 
Heads - and share it with everyone; sat in and around the main building with 
the music cranked. Conclusion? TTC = oil, me = water.:-)

The next job I had was working at a commercial deep sea dive shop in Santa 
Barbara, CA. 

--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Michael Jackson <mjackson74@...> wrote:
>
> Wow! Well said, Curtis. Would you say a bit more about sidhaland? I was 
> vaguely aware of it but I think that was after I had gotten free of TM. Where 
> was it, what was it and what was it like living there? 
> 
> 
> 


 

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