The answer is not in being able to say, "I could be wrong", in response to any 
question. The question is first, "Who am I?", and the answer takes awhile to 
reveal itself. 

It is a more efficient approach than this piecemeal, "...I could be wrong...", 
taken for each and every consideration of perspective. Both a waste of time, 
and a way to further dependence on the me, the ego, the mind appropriated for 
personal glory.

"I could be wrong...", is often used as false humility, rather than a true 
admission of fault. Often used to pretend a wider view than one is interested 
in seeing.

The verbally oriented child in the video is discovering his intellect, but 
hasn't begun to ask the question of himself, "Who am I?". Perhaps that is why 
you are so drawn to him? 

--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, turquoiseb <no_reply@...> wrote:
>
> He's still able to say, "I could be wrong."
> 
> http://www.npr.org/blogs/krulwich/2013/03/27/175455214/socrates-in-the-form-of-a-9-year-old-shows-up-in-a-suburban-backyard-in-washingt
>


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