Thanks for posting the information,but you failed to point out the
similarities:

Shankara's Advaita claims to be based on the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita
and the Brahma Sutras, but many scholars such as Sharma and Raju have noted
that Shankara shows many signs of influence from Mahayana Buddhism,
Madhyamaka, founded by Nagarjuna, the Yogacara, founded by Vasubandhu and
Asanga. Gaudapada incorporated aspects of Buddhism into Hindusim in order
to reinterpret the Upanishads and the Brahma Sutras.

1.  Gaudapada adapted the Buddhist concept of "ajata", the doctrine of
non-origination or non-creation, from Nagarjuna's Madhyamika. Ajata is the
fundamental philosophical doctrine of Gaudapada.

2. Advaita Vedanta also adopted from the Madhyamika the idea of two levels
of reality - "two truths" - absolute and relative.

3. Gaudapada and Shankara adopted almost all of the Buddhist dialectic,
methodology, arguments and analysis, their concepts, their terminologies
and even their philosophy of the Absolute.

4. Gaudapada embraced the Buddhist idea that the nature of the world is the
four-cornered negation.

5. Gaudapada adopted the Buddhist doctrines that ultimate reality is pure
consciousness.

P.S. You also did not explain the connection between the non-dualism of
Advaita Vedanta and the non-dualism of Kashmere Tantrsim.


On Wed, Jan 22, 2014 at 9:28 PM, <emptyb...@yahoo.com> wrote:

>
>
> In Tibetan Buddhism, Nagarjuna is the most important philosophical figure.
> It is like Thomas Aquinas for Roman Catholics. Madhyamaka is the basis for
> understanding Buddhism and Vij├▒anavada is a close correlate.
>
> Contrary to the Tibetans, Madhyamaka is not given the same exalted status
> in the history of Chinese Buddhism. Their conclusion was that the
> eight-fold negation of Nagarjuna set the framework for a final negation of
> all elements (dharmas) of experience, whether material, psychological, or
> celestial. However, according to them, this very conclusion cannot be
> final. That is because any negation (no matter how subtle or all
> encompassing) is by definition the opposite of an affirmation - not merely
> logically but in final meaning and result. It is therefore merely relative
> and is neither final nor absolute.
>
> Consequently, Madhyamaka was superseded by various other Buddhist schools
> until Hwa-Yen became the view that encompassed all other schools and all
> other elements of experience.
>
> That view about Madhyamaka was echoed by Shankara who characterized
> Madhyamaka as shunyavada and dismissed it rather swiftly. Shankara in
> fact saved some of his most pointed criticisms for the Buddhists of his
> day, particularly Vijnanavada.
>
>
>
> In spite of this, there are parallels between some of Gaudapada's
> statements and the views of Vijnanavada because they both draw from the
> same milieu of philosophic discourse.
>
>
> This is one reason that assertions that Advaita was a secret Buddhism
> demonstrate ignorance of the issues and shallow scholarship.
>
>
>
> As pointed out by K. A. Krishnaswamy Aiyer, Buddhism and Advaita are
> fundamentally opposed in five key points:
>
>
>
> 1.     Both say that the world is "unreal", but Buddhists mean that it is
> only a conceptual construct (vikalpa), while Shankara does not think that
> the world is merely conceptual.
>
>
>
> 2.     Momentariness is a cardinal principal of Buddhism - consciousness
> is fundamentally momentary for them. However, in Advaita, consciousness is
> pure (shuddha), without beginning or end (anadi) and is thoroughly
> continuous. The momentariness of empirical states of consciousness overlies
> this continuity.
>
>
>
> 3.     In Buddhism, the "self" is the ego (the "I") - a conceptual
> construct that is quite unreal. In Advaita, the Self is the only "really
> Real" and is the basis of all concepts.
>
>
>
> 4.     In Buddhism, avidya causes us to construct continuities (such as
> the self) where there are none. In Advaita, avidya causes us instead to
> take what is unreal to be real and what is real to be unreal.
>
>
>
> 5.     Removal of avidya leads to nirvana/blowning out for Buddhists but
> for Shankara it leads to perfect knowledge (vidya).
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>   
>

Reply via email to