On 10/22/2014 3:07 PM, inmadi...@hotmail.com [FairfieldLife] wrote:
This may be above my pay-grade, but if one is a transcendentalist/idealist, then belief in classic cause and effect is incompatible with that belief . . . or one has to significantly qualify what is meant by cause and effect.
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/According to MMY, there are two truths: one relative and one absolute. Cause and effect is the law of relativity which states that Causality is the relation between an event and a second event in which the second event is a consequence of the first. This is a truth based on common sense perception so that we can function in the physical world.//
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//The absolute truth or ultimate truth is beyond or transcendental to the provisional truth of the senses. The Advaita Vedanta idea of two levels of truth (Sanskrit: satya) is similar to the Buddhist doctrine of the two truths (Tibetan: bden-pa gnyis). /
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Many folks who refer to them selves as transcendentalists/idealists are actually dualists, or simply rebranded materialists (I am not suggesting you are)
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/All the authors of the classic Upanishads were transcendentalists - they all believed there was a field beyond the senses. But, not all of the Upanishadic thinkers were non-dualists, some were qualified non-dualists and others were dualists or quasi-non-dualists.//It's complicated./
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Regarding the 'illusion' - when you pick up an object, like an apple for example, what does your experience tell you? When I pick up an apple, I see it's color and shape, I feel the texture and if pressed with a fingernail - I can sense the sticky juice, I taste the tart sweetness . . . and I remember apple pies and so forth. My experience of the apple is passionate and lively - Where is the illusion?
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/Maya is a perception which is not real, yet not un-real either. It is real because it is presented to us, but not real in the absolute sense. //Maya is like a dream which is true as long as it persists./
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Toss in more awareness and all you get is more passion - there is no illusion. 'Illusion' is just India of old - we don't need no stinking illusion in the 21st century.
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/Maya is just the way things appear, an appearance only. Maya is phenomena, an appearance is true but not absolutely true. Maya is not false, since it is based on sense perception. //This is the view of Advaita Vedanta according to Shankara.//It is a very powerful philosophy and in many ways supported by Immanuel Kant./

/Note://

In my first philosophy class my professor asked the class what they thought about MIND: I raised my hand a said that mind "is just a continuous series of thought-instants that actuall do not move around in the mind" and the professor threw a paper wad right at me. Go figure.
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//"Transcendental idealism is a doctrine founded by German philosopher Immanuel Kant in the 18th century. Kant's doctrine maintains that human experience of things is similar to the way they appear to us – implying a fundamentally subject-based component, rather than being an activity that directly (and therefore without any obvious causal link) comprehends the things as they are in and of themselves.//"
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//http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transcendental_idealism/

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