--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, anon_astute_ff <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>
> --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "authfriend" <jstein@> wrote:
> >
> > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, anon_astute_ff <no_reply@> 
> > wrote:
> > >
> > > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, TurquoiseB <no_reply@> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Michael Dean Goodman 
> > > > <Tantra@> wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > Dear Fairfield Lifers,
> > > > > 
> > > > > In response to the recent discussions on this list about 
> > > > > the TM course fee [Why does T/M cost so much to join? A 
> > > > > little help?], I'll re-post my controversial essay from 
> > > > > a few years ago.  I first posted it on this list...
> > > > 
> > > > Since reposts are in vogue, here's a repost of one 
> > > > of mine, somewhat shorter than Michael's:
> > > > 
> > > > I entered "learn to meditate" into Google and checked 
> > > > what it costs to learn, from the first page of sites 
> > > > found that listed prices: 
> > > > 
> > > >  1. $0 -- the techniques are provided on the website. 
> > > >  2. $1.65 to $10.85 -- it's a book, sold through Amazon. 
> > > >  3. $59.90 -- a home study course (Yogananda tradition). 
> > > >  4. $0 -- instruction provided online, MP3s of talks 
> > > >     provided for free, week-long in-residence retreats 
> > > >     that include room and board for $295. 
> > > >  5. $0 -- instruction provided online. 
> > > >  6. $69 to $169 per day -- in-residence instruction that
> > > >     includes room and board from Shambhala Mountain Center. 
> > > >  7. $11.95 -- book. 
> > > >  8. $0 -- instruction provided online. 
> > > >  9. $4.95 -- book. 
> > > > 10. $10.95 -- book. 
> > > > 11. $0 -- Vipassana tradition, free classes. 
> > > > 12. $0 -- instruction provided online. 
> > > > 13. $2500 -- the first TM-related site, 
> > > >     http://www.tm.safire.com/ 
> > > > 14. $0 -- instruction provided online (Australian). 
> > > > 15. $240 -- six-hour course in Stamford, CT. 
> > > > 16. $88 to $122 -- London Buddhist Center (4-week course). 
> > > > 
> > > > Does one stand out from the rest?
> > > 
> > > An insight that may be useful in this discussion is what economists
> > > refer to as "consumer surplus". It is the difference between what a
> > > consumer is willing to pay for a good or service, and the actual
> > > market price. For example, I may be willing to pay up to $300 / 
> > > month for broadband internet access -- it has at least $300 of 
> > > value to me, but I am more than happy to pay just $40 /month to one 
> > > of several providers who offer it for that price. The $260 
> > > difference is consumer surplus -- one of the great windfalls of 
> > > modern economies. We generally pay a lot less for things than the 
> > > value they supply to us.
> > > 
> > > Thus, if the argument is that we should be willing to pay up to the
> > > full value of TM has some merit if there are no "substitutes". But 
> > > if there are equivalent services available, the market cost of 
> > > substitues is much lower than value (willingness to pay). Rational 
> > > consumers don't often pay full value -- they pay market price and 
> > > enjoy the -- often large -- consumer surplus.
> > > 
> > > Some might argue that TM has no equivalents -- that it is a highly
> > > "differentiated" product and thus a price equal to or near full 
> > > value is rational. That of course requires that the case for product
> > > uniqueness can be effectively made -- a growing challenge given the
> > > evidence provided in prior posts.
> > 
> > However, you can get precisely the same product for
> > much less from teachers no longer affiliated with the
> > organization.
> > 
> > It's no longer the case that the only place you can
> > get the product is from the company that developed it.
> > You no longer have to pay a steep price just for the 
> > proprietary name.
> 
> That was my point. Was it expressed that unclearly? Or simply too
> diplomatically -- allowing for the view of some that there is no
> substitute for TM.
> 

Another way of stating my points are:

1) Some argue that TM has huge value and people should be willing to
pay up to that value. (Which may or may not be MDG's position, but has
been expressed by others.)

2) We often do not pay full  value for many things -- because the
market price is less -- often substantially less -- than the  value of
the product to us. 
 
3) Determinants of market price include the price and availablity of
substitutes -- if low priced substitutes are available -- those will
usually be chosen.

4) For many, there are a number of lower priced equivalents /
substitutes for TM thus creating an opportunity for substantial
consumer surplus -- we may be willing to pay $2500 which is the value
of TM to us, but will be happy to pay $200 if an equivalent substitute
 is abvailable.

5) For some, TM is highly differntiated aka "special" and in that 
view -- there are no substitutes. Thus they will pay up to $2500 for TM.





------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~--> 
Join modern day disciples reach the disfigured and poor with hope and healing
http://us.click.yahoo.com/lMct6A/Vp3LAA/i1hLAA/UlWolB/TM
--------------------------------------------------------------------~-> 

To subscribe, send a message to:
[EMAIL PROTECTED]

Or go to: 
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/
and click 'Join This Group!' 
Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FairfieldLife/

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
    [EMAIL PROTECTED]

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
 



Reply via email to