See how much more effective it is to present the 
positive side of your beliefs than to whine about 
somebody "attacking" them?

And didn't it *feel* better?

I rest my case...

--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "Ingegerd" 
<[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>
> Thank you for a very profound explanation, that I appreciate very 
> much.
> Without knowing the term Bhakti - it seems that I the last year 
> uncounscious has chosen the traditional Bhakti path. I am very 
> aware of mood-making. But when it comes natural - it feels 
> natural. Not permanant - maybe in the future.
> Thank you again.
> Ingegerd
> 
> > Bhakti is a Sanskrit word which means devotion, adoration, love 
or
> > worship of the Divine or the Guru as a manifestation thereof. It 
> can
> > also mean the love of God toward the devotee. As a sentiment, 
> Bhakti
> > can be part of many path,but there is also a specific path called
> > 'Bhakti Yoga' (Path of Devotion) as opposed to 'Jnana 
> Yoga'(wisdom) or
> > 'Raja Yoga' (meditation). It is the contention of many Saints 
like
> > Ramana Maharshi or Ramakrishna, that all these paths are not
> > contradictionary, but finally merge into each other.Somebody (I 
> don't
> > remember whom) once said that while Ramakrishna was a Bhakta on 
the
> > outside, he was a Jnani inside, and Ramana Maharshi was a Jnani
> > outside and a Bhakta inside. A Jnani (Sage, a saint who followed 
> the
> > path of wisdom) will also, automatically develop devotion, his 
> path is
> > also a way of surrendering the intellect. So has Ramana 
Maharshi, 
> who
> > almost exclusively taught self-enquiry, written many devotional 
> hymns
> > to Shiva in the form of Mount Arunachala.Besides that, in all 
Hindu
> > related faiths, the reverence and adoration of the Guru is 
> prescribed,
> > independend of the path.
> > 
> > The Bhakti path explicitely seeks to use emotion to be a way to 
> unite
> > or come near to God. This usually employs a dualistic conception,
> > since it is thought, that love requires an object. Yet in the
> > non-dualistic philosophies, like Advaita, Bhakti still plays a 
> role,
> > either in the love to the Guru, who is traditionally helt to be 
an
> > embodiement of God, or in the form of a Istha-devata, a Form of 
the
> > ultimate, especially chosen for worship, which in the case of 
> worship
> > is identified as the formless Brahman, adopting a form for the 
> sake of
> > worship.
> > 
> > Worship can have many forms, almost as many as there are people.
> > Traditionally Bhaktas (Adherents of Bhakti) will do Japa, i.e.
> > repetition of the name or names of their chosen ideal. They will 
> sing
> > Kirtanas (again rythmic repetitions of divine names) and Bhajans
> > (devotional songs and poems), do pujas (ceremonies similar to 
the 
> TM
> > puja) etc. Service is also regarded as a Bhakti practise.
> > 
> > The Narada Bhakti sutras deline different modes of feeling 
(Bhavas)
> >  or attitudes of the Bhakta to the deity:
> > 
> > Servant: the relationship of a servant to a master, like that of
> > Hanuman to Rama
> > 
> > Friendship: The relationship of a friend, like that between 
Arjuna 
> and
> > Krishna. This relationship is closer than the previous.
> > 
> > Parental relationship: God is seen as one's child - even closer.
> > 
> > Husband/wife relationship: God is seen as romantic partner, like 
in
> > the case of the Gopis and Krishna.
> > 
> > At all there are 9 such modes or Bhavas.
> > 
> > In my references to this topic, I made no proposal for the 
explicit
> > path of Bhakti Yoga - contrary to what Barry and others here 
> claimed,
> > but was referring to the spontaneaus Bhakti that may arise on 
any 
> path
> > at any stage, the feeling of adoration and love towards a Guru, 
the
> > natural opening of the heart as a mystic process. I was making 
the
> > suggestion, that those who had experienced such an opening, 
would 
> also
> > recognize it in the expression of others, even if the follow a
> > different ideal (God/Guru) or religion (Islam). I thought this 
to 
> be
> > quite natural among advanced spiritual practitioners.
> > 
> > Actually most of conventional religion may be termed as a sort of
> > Bhakti Yoga. 
> > 
> > In terms of TM: Maharishi rarely uses this term but he makes very
> > definite allusions to the Bhakti path or rather element in his
> > teaching, when he speaks of 'the finest feeling level', which in 
> his
> > eyes 'has to be protected'. In Maharsihis philosophy Bhakti 
plays 
> the
> > essential role on the path between CC and GC. He also said that 
the
> > greatest enemies on the path are doubt, disappointnment, and 
there 
> was
> > a third one I forgot.
> > 
> > You could say:
> > Karma Yoga > CC > loss of identification with the Doer. (Non-
> doership
> > of the Gita)
> > Bhakti Yoga > GC > Increased perception of the Self in the 
outside,
> > the finest relative
> > Jnana Yoga > UC > Ultimate merging of the Self inside with the 
Self
> > everywhere. Seeing everything in terms of the Self. Thus the
> > fulfillment of Bhakti.
> > 
> > There is a certain trap in CC: As everything is witnessed, there 
> is a
> > basic separation between the Self and the world. Action becomes
> > spontaneus, and there is no incentive to go on. Thats why MMY 
once
> > said that rather than dying in CC, one should smoke a cigarette.
> > Meaning, you can't go further when dying in CC. It is only Love 
> that
> > can bridge the gap between Self and the world when being in CC.
> >
>






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