The TM movement was a good ride for me for many
> years. I regret none of those years. And then it
> was a rough ride for me for many years, as I tried
> to deal with the cognitive dissonance of realizing
> that not only didn't deliver on its promises, it
> had some pretty scary ways of not delivering. But I
> regret none of those years either. I learned a lot
> from both parts of the ride. Wouldn't take that bus
> again if they paid me ten times the amount of money
> I spent originally, but I don't regret it.

Well said.  Regrets don't do us much good.  I also had fantastic
experiences in the movement.  I didn't leave because I thought MMY was
an asshole, I left because I thought he was wrong.  But recreating my
life after leaving was an unique opportunity to reassess my most basic
assumptions about life.  For me it was in my 30's, and that experience
was worth the price of admission.  I learned so much about my values
in those years after leaving the group.  To have an opportunity to do
an epistemological overhaul later in life is something I value. It
opened me up to how I gain beliefs and the choices I have.  Not so bad
for 15 years in the theme park!  It taught me to hang out with people
who think differently than I do, which is as close to a spiritual
practice as I desire these days.

Nice post.




--- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, TurquoiseB <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>
> --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "curtisdeltablues"
> <curtisdeltablues@> wrote:
> >
> > I can point no fingers here because  my group was directly told by 
> > MMY
> > that three years of sidhaland would perfect our sidhis.  It was part
> > of his hook to get our slave labor.  We rounded our asses off,
> > confident that we were just short of our goal.  Do you think I 
> > popped
> > up at the end of three years and asked "where's my Maypo?" ( a
> > reference that dates me!)  No.  I just sucked it up and soldered on,
> > confident that the man, who directly failed in his own prediction,
> > would be right the next time.  I think after a certain number of
> > years, consistency and commitment, (described in the book Influence,
> > The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert B. Cialdini), kicks in too
> > strongly.  Challenging MMY's wrong predictions would put the whole
> > thing on the table for re-examination. It is easier just to blame
> > yourself for your own imperfections than to challenge the man who 
> > has failed by his own self-stated goals.  The phenomenon is amazing
> > on so many levels isn't it? 
> 
> I can certainly identify with what you say here.
> But I have no regrets, no more than I have about
> staying in a love affair past its expiration date. 
> 
> I use that analogy purposefully. We were in a 
> love affair with Maharishi and the pursuit of
> enlightenment. When we first got involved in it,
> it was exciting and "something good was happen-
> ing" at regular enough intervals to keep us from
> questioning any of the "little things," no more
> than we would have in a love affair that was still 
> hot. But then the love affair cooled down, and we
> stuck it out anyway because part of us remembered 
> how it used to be, and hoped that it could be that 
> way again. And so we kept on keepin' on, for 
> months or years or even decades after the magic 
> has gone. And then one day we just couldn't take 
> it any more, and we split.
> 
> But it's not really the other party's fault that
> we stayed too long in a dead love affair, is it?
> 
> At any point along the way, we had the ability
> to step back from it all and see that it was no
> longer a good fit for us, that we no longer
> believed that we "had a future together."
> 
> Yes, there IS subtle psychological coercion in
> spiritual groups to keep you keepin' on long past
> the point where you no longer believe in it, but
> we're always the ones who allow that coercion to
> work or who choose to not allow it to work. 
> 
> The TM movement was a good ride for me for many
> years. I regret none of those years. And then it
> was a rough ride for me for many years, as I tried
> to deal with the cognitive dissonance of realizing
> that not only didn't deliver on its promises, it 
> had some pretty scary ways of not delivering. But I
> regret none of those years either. I learned a lot
> from both parts of the ride. Wouldn't take that bus 
> again if they paid me ten times the amount of money 
> I spent originally, but I don't regret it.
>






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