Maybe, as a group, we could make an effort of some kind of a basic flyer about 
FeLV, for stupid veterinarians and rescue groups who at some point, have to 
deal with such decisions on ending a cat's life because of FIV/FeLV.

-----Original Message-----
From: felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org 
[mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of dlg...@windstream.net
Sent: Tuesday, December 27, 2011 9:26 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Exposure to Feline Leukemia Does Not Always Result 
inDisease

I preach to everyone who will listen that they should not end a cat's life just 
because of 1 test.  My 2 positives are now 7 and 3 years, healthy as all my 
other cats and no one who is negaive has contracted the disease.  
Next command is spay and neuter.  Another woman and I are starting a housing 
and feeding statioin for the ferals in Silex.  The town is moving up on the 
hill because of flooding and they will not let anyoe bring/encourage ferals in 
the new town.  So to save them from extinction, we are getting a safe place for 
them in the old town. Recently learned that a neighboring town deals with stray 
dogs and cats b sticking their noses in a cars exhaust pipe.  Starting 
apetition against that.  Thy don't even try to take them to arescue 
organization, ust catch tem and kill them.  Even if the belong to someone and 
were outside.  We are trying to find someone i tat town to start an Alley Cat 
program for dos and cats.  At least they won't reproduce and gie people another 
reason to kill them.


---- Maureen Olvey <molvey...@hotmail.com> wrote: 
> 
> Glad to hear that about Amber.  I haven't been able to follow along with all 
> the posts these last few months but I had wondered what had happened with 
> Amber.  She's the one your husband built that nice big totally awesome 
> enclosure for - right?  That's so awesome that she turned out to be negative. 
>  Especially since she started out so malnourished.  I hope you told the vet 
> that so he would know not to suggest killing the next cat that test positive 
> on the initial combo test.
> 
> “I am not interested to know whether vivisection produces results that 
> are profitable to the human race or doesn’t….the pain which it 
> inflicts upon unconsenting animals is the basis of my enmity toward 
> it, and it is to me sufficient justification of the enmity without 
> looking further.” – Mark Twain
>  
> 
> 
> 
> Date: Tue, 27 Dec 2011 08:05:05 -0800
> From: jannestay...@yahoo.com
> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Exposure to Feline Leukemia Does Not Always 
> Result inDisease
> 
> 
> 
> So many cats are put down unecessarily after testing positive on the first 
> test. I went through this with my sweet Calico, Amber. After rescuing her, 
> she tested positive in the vets office and they thought I should end her 
> life. I decided against that had her retested 3 months later. She tested 
> negative and also had a negative IFA test. I've had her 9 months now and she 
> is an 8lb kitty who bullies the three other cats who are twice her size. She 
> likes to have boxing matches with them. They never hurt each other. She just 
> wants to show she is not afraid. LOL. She is so full of energy and very 
> affectionate when she wants to be. I am so glad I waited and did not end the 
> life of this precious animal.
> 
>  
> Jannes
> 
> 
> 
> From: Lynda Wilson <longhornf...@verizon.net>
> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Sent: Monday, December 26, 2011 7:19 PM
> Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Exposure to Feline Leukemia Does Not Always 
> Result inDisease
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> This is what I have read about FeLV as well.
>  
> L
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: GRAS
> To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
> Sent: Monday, December 26, 2011 5:03 PM
> Subject: [Felvtalk] Exposure to Feline Leukemia Does Not Always Result 
> inDisease
> 
> 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Exposure to Feline Leukemia Does Not Always Result in Disease by JaneA 
> Kelley, Cat expert and animal communicator
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> When a cat is exposed to the feline leukemia virus (FeLV), the cat might have 
> a transient infection and fight it off, developing immunity -- some vets say 
> that up to 70 percent of adult cats survive exposure this way. If the cat 
> doesn't overcome the initial infection, the virus will move to the bone 
> marrow and the cat will be persistently infected. And finally, the cat may 
> continue to harbor the virus, thereby becoming a carrier.
> 
> Many latently infected cats actually become free of the virus after a few 
> years, but others become persistently infected. Cats that test positive 
> should be retested 12 weeks later to confirm the diagnosis.
> 
> 
> 
> Add a comment |
>  
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