From: fis-boun...@listas.unizar.es [mailto:fis-boun...@listas.unizar.es] On 
Behalf Of Jerry LR Chandler
Sent: 27 May 2013 09:51 PM
To: fis@listas.unizar.es
Subject: Re: [Fis] fis Digest, Vol 571, Issue 17 Role of First Principles in 
Information theory

FISers, John, Bruno:

First, John's comment.

Obviously my comment was not "vapid" otherwise you would not have responded to 
it!  :-)  :-)  :-)

As to metaphysics (first principles):

I wrote:

Your notion of metaphysics appears to so extremely narrowly restricted that you 
can exempt your own highly metaphysical writings from your definition of 
metaphysics.  In fact, the traditional usage of the term "metaphysics" is not 
narrowly restricted.

Metaphysics has to do with two things, ontology and necessity

Your response amply demonstrates my point.

Let use look at the Apple dictionary definition of "metaphysics"

" the branch of philosophy that deals with the first principles of things, 
including abstract concepts such as being, knowing, substance, cause, identity, 
time, and space.
* abstract theory or talk with no basis in reality"

Well, I will reply that I deal with all of those things through either ontology 
or necessity together with empirical features. Cause, yes in several papers, 
has to do with ontology and necessity; identity, yes in several papers, has to 
do with necessity and ontology; substance, yes in that I don't think it makes 
sense except in the empirical sense in which we talk of substances; knowing is 
epistemology and shouldn't have been included; being=ontology; time and space 
are empirical.

The definition you gave is rather a naïve and superficial one, but it can be 
explained.

A minimalist metaphysics can be extremely powerful in dealing with traditional 
metaphysical issues when it is combined with a scientific attitude. Without 
metaphysics science is blind and stumbling around. But everyone needs what I 
suppose, as I have indicated in an argument you have never addressed with 
reason, to be able to make sense of phenomena. Bits must underlie the 
distinctions we find in experience. A lot of logic and mathematics provides the 
necessity that ties them together, but that on  its own isn't enough either, 
because it gives no ontology. We need both.

John

======= Please find our Email Disclaimer here-->: 
http://www.ukzn.ac.za/disclaimer =======
_______________________________________________
fis mailing list
fis@listas.unizar.es
https://webmail.unizar.es/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/fis

Reply via email to