In the River of Consciousness by Oliver Sacks
http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2004/jan/15/in-the-river-of-consciousness/?pagination=false


On Tue, Feb 21, 2012 at 9:19 AM, Jonathan Walley <wall...@denison.edu> wrote:
>
> Of course, Arnheim did write an ART AND VISUAL PERCEPTION focused on film - 
> FILM AS ART. Though the science behind it has largely been discredited, it's 
> still a very important work, a totally enjoyable read, and, I think, a valid 
> aesthetic statement.
>
> Also in the "discredited science but still worth reading" department is 
> Eisenstein's essay "A Dialectical Approach to Film Form," in which Eisenstein 
> extends his Marxian dialectic theory of montage all the way from to the 
> perception of movement in film projection to the formation of abstract 
> political ideas while viewing propaganda films.
>
> "The Myth of Persistence of Vision" and "The Myth of Persistence of Vision 
> Revisited," by Joseph Anderson and Barbara Fisher are must reads - I've had 
> colleagues who still teach the "persistence of vision" theory (and several 
> film/video production manuals and cinema studies textbooks still trot it 
> out). Anderson and Fisher do a very thorough job of debunking it, and clearly 
> and compellingly advance other possibilities. It's a classic of cognitivist 
> scholarship.
>
> Some of David Bordwell's writing also addresses fundamental processes of 
> cinematic perception. See, especially, his blog entries on eye movements:
>
> http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/2011/02/06/the-eyes-mind/
>
> http://www.davidbordwell.net/blog/2011/02/14/watching-you-watch-there-will-be-blood/
>
> These last few readings are heavily foot/end-noted, and so will likely point 
> you in the direction of other readings, too.
> And yes, the Wees book is great.
>
> Best,
> Jonathan
>
>
> On Feb 21, 2012, at 10:02 AM, Jonathan Thomas wrote:
>
> 'Light Moving in Time' by William Wees is a good place to start, I think. 
> Also, there's a great page here that collects essays by Paul Sharits - 
> definitely worth a look as filmic perception was a fundamental concern of his.
> Jonathan
>
> cinema metafisica - artistic research into the cinematic apparatus and the 
> still life tradition
> DecemberLab - supporting, promoting and developing artists' moving image
>
>
> --- On Tue, 21/2/12, franco base <frenk.ca...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
> From: franco base <frenk.ca...@gmail.com>
> Subject: [Frameworks] books about Film and Perception
> To: "Experimental Film Discussion List" <frameworks@jonasmekasfilms.com>
> Date: Tuesday, 21 February, 2012, 14:38
>
> Hi.
> Can you suggest me some books
> about connection between film and Visual Perception?
> Something like Arnheim's Art and Visual Perception focalized on Film.
> For example
> Id' like to investigate the behavoir of human brain during the black 
> intervals between frames
> or during flicker or during transition from negative to positive...
>
>
> Thanks in advance
>
> F.
>
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>
> Jonathan Walley
> Associate Professor of Cinema
> Denison University
> wall...@denison.edu
>
>
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